Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Freedom From Shame’

“I’ve decided not to have a crabby attitude about Thanksgiving this year,” I casually announced to my husband yesterday. If you can’t imagine anyone having a crabby attitude about Thanksgiving, I call as my witness this post from Thanksgiving 6 years ago. I began this blog nearly 8 years ago to share my journey through several challenges: being gluten free (before it was the popular thing to do), homeschooling a child with behavioral problems and learning challenges, financial strain, health issues, and losing a parent to dementia. Over the past 10 years I have dealt with loss after loss, which has particularly affected me during the holidays.

For years, I dreaded Thanksgiving and Christmas. It began with my son’s gluten free diagnosis the week before Christmas in 2008. Back then, gluten free items were expensive, hard to find, and tasted terrible. You were considered strange if you said you didn’t eat wheat, and no one knew what gluten was. That Christmas, I grieved the loss of a normal life for my son, and I grieved for myself because I would have to learn how to cook all over again with new ingredients that didn’t play by the rules. To this day, whenever I hear the Amy Grant song, “Breath of Heaven,” I remember crying in the car while listening to it on the way home from my first terrifying gluten free shopping trip, and praying, “God, I need you to hold me together because my world is falling apart.”

Then, the week before Christmas in 2009 we took my son out of public school and made the terrifying decision to homeschool him because of his writing difficulty (which I would later discover is Dysgraphia). Again, I grieved during the holidays the loss of a normal life for him and me. Fast forward to 2010, when my husband’s workplace folded because of the recession, leaving him unemployed for both that Christmas and Christmas of 2011. In 2012, he had a job, but it barely paid the bills, and we struggled to rebuild our finances. Then, in 2013, my mom had a stroke that left her with vascular dementia, erasing her memory and personality. That was effectively the year I lost my mom, even though she didn’t die until 2016.

Thanksgiving of 2013 was a particularly low point for me. I already hated how much work it was (back then) to create all our family’s favorite holiday dishes from scratch because there were no gluten free shortcuts like cream of mushroom soup or stuffing bread cubes. I had to dip tiny onion segments in batter individually and fry them myself in order to make green bean casserole. I was bitter over all the work I had to do for one meal that was over in less than an hour. Plus, the expense of gluten free food compounded financial stress. Plus, I had to clean my house for company (which always made me grumpy) because we were hosting my parents since my mom could no longer cook due to her dementia. Plus, I still didn’t know how I could relate to the person who technically was my mom, yet she wasn’t. That ugly Thanksgiving morning, I snapped at my family and ruined breakfast. I cried in my closet over all the loss that came crashing down on me at once. I felt defeated.

In 2016, I reached a tipping point. I lost my mom and put my son back in public school within a matter of months. God redeemed the heartache of losing one of my best friends by strengthening my relationship with my sister through the whole ordeal. She is my best friend (aside from my husband) and also a spiritual warrior who has helped me overcome generational strongholds. That fall, we prayed together and forgave those in our family line who had normalized a life of bondage to fear, and asked God to break the cycle in us and in our children. Within a couple of weeks, God healed me of my food sensitivities that had arisen out of the stress of the past several years, and set me free from my fear of food.

At the same time, God began to whisper crazy things to me about my son, like, “The things you fear are not real.” What? Back in 2016, God challenged me to believe that all the fears I had for my son’s future were based on behaviors of the past that would not carry into his future. I dared to believe God and was able to break free from the stronghold of fear that had gripped me as a homeschooler. But things didn’t get better for my son; they got worse. The stress of school launched health problems for him that have lingered for over two years now.

The week before Christmas in 2016, I was once again on my knees before the Lord in tears, begging God for direction and healing. That’s when God whispered something else totally crazy: “I will heal your son. Just celebrate me.” I was about to put my son on a restrictive diet to see if that would help him get rid of his digestive problems, but God said no. He was more concerned with my son’s emotional health, and wanted him to celebrate Christmas without the loss of favorite foods. So we just celebrated God’s goodness and provision. It was my first Christmas with no mother, and my son’s health issues and school stress were still there. While we were not celebrating any improvement in our circumstances, we chose to celebrate God and fix our eyes on him.

That choice to celebrate God and rest in his provision while believing him for deliverance launched a season of spiritual renewal and redemption. God blessed my husband’s work, and steadily increased his salary. We thought we would never get rid of our second mortgage, but God challenged me to believe that he would help us do what we could not, and I dared to believe him. Last year, we paid off our $55,000 second mortgage after completely draining our savings just 5 years earlier. God heard my cries, walked me through those painful holidays when I had to choose contentment, and worked miracles to provide what we simply could not do on our own. He used those years of financial strain to bring to the surface deeply rooted issues relating to financial bondage, and challenge me to believe that God wanted to bless me.

God then released us from the gluten free diet a year ago, restoring freedom to our family. But most amazing has been the transformation in my son. When I exiled him from homeschool in 2016 it was because he had become lazy, argumentative, entitled, and exasperating (you know, a typical 14-year-old). Two years after I turned him over to God and the public school system to discipline him, he underwent a dramatic change. I can only explain it as a work of the Holy Spirit. His laziness is gone. His resistance to authority is gone. Entitlement has been replaced by humility. As we have celebrated God and continued to read his Word as a family, God has taken hold of my son and transformed him into a new person. The difference in his behavior caused nothing short of shock and awe.

He has learned how to suffer physically, yet choose joy in the Lord. He is uncompromising in his faith and commitment toward obedience to God, which translates into obedience to those in authority over him and being impervious to peer pressure. God has healed him mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. All that is left is the physical healing. Although I have often given credit to the gluten free diet and homeschooling on this blog for tiny improvements in my son’s behavior, he was eating wheat and going to public school when God miraculously transformed him, literally overnight. God gets 100% of the glory!

Yes, those things were important parts of our story because the gluten free diet is what prompted me to start this blog, which is how I discovered that I am a writer. And homeschooling gave me an opportunity to focus on raising my son in the knowledge of the Lord, which is ultimately how God is healing him in every way. While God’s path to change in my son and in my life has been watered with tears, I would not erase it. He is a new person, and the things I once feared no longer hang over me. This blog stands as a testimony of God’s faithfulness to lead us through some of the darkest hours of my life.

My sister-in-law designed this for an apron (which I can’t wear because it’s white – hence the wrinkles from being stored in a drawer). Each part of my blog story shows part of the cross I have carried, but Jesus has the final word over the cross!

Right Back Where We Started or Completing the Lesson?
As I reflect on the past 10 years, which have been documented on this blog, I can’t help but notice that some cycles seem to be repeating themselves. This past week, we determined that my son was trapped in a viscous cycle of health problems being disruptive to school, which in turn caused homework to pile up (despite his best efforts) and lead to more stress which feeds his health problems. So we decided to break the loop and found an alternative schedule that will allow him to take some of his classes online through the school district at home. Essentially, we’re returning to part-time homeschool, right before the holidays again. But this time, my son is determined to be responsible for himself and work hard with a good attitude. This time, we made a change not because my son couldn’t get good grades, but because his A’s came at the cost of his physical health.

We’re also working with a functional medicine doctor to reduce my son’s inflammation, and the doctor has asked us to take him off of both gluten and dairy while we’re in the diagnosing stage, to eliminate those as possible inflammatory contributors. So here we are, the week before Thanksgiving, on an even more restrictive diet than before. Oh, and all of his expensive medical tests and supplements, on top of other big expenses, have left us pinching pennies for the holidays. Again. Those old, familiar temptations to give in to grumbling and despair resurfaced last week. Sure, I’d worked through the trials and found joy, but would I still choose joy if all my freedoms were taken away again? Sometimes we don’t know how much we’ve learned until God gives us a test.

What do we do when we find ourselves right back where we were before, repeating a familiar cycle? Does it mean that we are doomed to repeat the same trials our entire life, or is God giving us an opportunity to apply the lessons we’ve learned and face that same trial with spiritual maturity? I have learned from reading the Bible that the cycles documented in the Scriptures were meant to give both the people in the Bible and us opportunities to learn from the past and mature in our faith.

I don’t want you to forget, dear brothers and sisters, about our ancestors in the wilderness long ago. All of them were guided by a cloud that moved ahead of them, and all of them walked through the sea on dry ground. In the cloud and in the sea, all of them were baptized as followers of Moses. All of them ate the same spiritual food, and all of them drank the same spiritual water. For they drank from the spiritual rock that traveled with them, and that rock was Christ. Yet God was not pleased with most of them, and their bodies were scattered in the wilderness. 

These things happened as a warning to us, so that we would not crave evil things as they did, or worship idols as some of them did. As the Scriptures say, “The people celebrated with feasting and drinking, and they indulged in pagan revelry.” And we must not engage in sexual immorality as some of them did, causing 23,000 of them to die in one day. Nor should we put Christ to the test, as some of them did and then died from snakebites. And don’t grumble as some of them did, and then were destroyed by the angel of death.

These things happened to them as examples for us. They were written down to warn us who live at the end of the age. If you think you are standing strong, be careful not to fall. The temptations in your life are no different from what others experience. And God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure (1 Corinthians 10:1-12).

The struggles and temptations you and I face are no different from the temptations humanity has faced for thousands of years. Sure, the specifics may be different, but the temptation is the same. Israel was tempted to grumble when they were stuck in the desert eating manna. I was tempted to grumble when I was stuck with the gluten free diet restrictions during the holidays. Israel was tempted to give in to fear and unbelief when they had the opportunity to enter the Promised Land, and I was tempted not to believe that God would ever restore us financially or give my son – whom I could only view as broken for so many years – a good life. But God gives us a way out of temptation and cycles of brokenness. Jesus came to set us free from bondage to sin and shame.

How God Helps Us Break Cycles
When the children of the unbelieving generation of Israelites were ready to enter the Promised Land their parents failed to enter, God purposely led them in a way that would help them break the cycle of unbelief. He brought them through the Jordan River on dry ground, just as he had delivered their parents through the Red Sea on dry ground, but this time he had each tribe gather a stone from the middle of the river to set up as a memorial so they wouldn’t forget what God had done for them. That’s what this blog has been for me. It serves as a reminder not just of the trials I’ve gone through, but of how God has brought me through each one. He has delivered me around or sometimes through every obstacle, and brought me safely to the other side. So this Thanksgiving, instead of giving into despair over the battles still ahead, I choose to gaze at these stones of remembrance and thank God for his faithfulness to our family time and time again.

After crossing the Jordan, the Israelites were circumcised as a sign of God’s covenant with them. God then told them, “Today I have rolled away the shame of your slavery in Egypt” (Joshua 5:9). God named the place Gilgal, which means “to roll.” We cannot break the negative cycles in our past until God rolls away our shame. For a Christian, sanctification is the process of inviting God to “circumcise our heart” and replace our rebellious, hardened heart with a tender heart of obedience out of love for God, as promised in Ezekiel. “I will take away their stony, stubborn heart and give them a tender, responsive heart” (Ezekiel 11:19). That is exactly what happened with my son last summer.

Afterward, we encouraged him to be baptized because that is the “Gilgal” for Christians, when we physically experience God rolling away our shame. My son has felt a lot of shame over his behavior as a child and early in his teen years. God does not want him to live with that shame, so he washes it away in the baptismal waters. What a joy it has been to welcome my son “home” to do school and release him from his former reproach. That’s what our Heavenly Father promises to do for all of us! Just as Gilgal became the base camp for the battles in the Promised Land, when the enemy tries to pull us back into shame over our past, we need to return to our Gilgal to rest and declare, “I am not that person anymore. God has rolled away my shame.”

After the Israelites entered the Promised Land and began to eat the produce of the land, the manna dried up and was never seen again. The Israelites would now have to work for their food, and trust that God would provide through them, not just for them. Now that my husband has a good-paying job, as the cycle of financial strain repeats itself, I have to rely on God to help me be a good steward of our resources. I still have to choose contentment and live beneath my means, even though I have more choices available. When I had no confidence that we would ever get out of debt, I had to trust God to provide for our needs. Now that we are out of debt and financially stable, I still have to trust God and not panic when we dip into savings. God wants to end the cycle of fear and scarcity by giving me opportunities to choose contentment whether we have little or much. God is able to bring each of us to the place where we can join with the Apostle Paul in saying, I have learned how to be content with whatever I have. I know how to live on almost nothing or with everything. I have learned the secret of living in every situation, whether it is with a full stomach or empty, with plenty or little. For I can do everything through Christ, who gives me strength” (Philippians 4:11-13).

When it was finally time for the Israelites to face their first battle in the Promised Land, God gave them specific instructions that would help them overcome the mistakes of their grumbling parents. They would conquer Jericho by walking around it – in silence. “Do not shout; do not even talk,” Joshua commanded. “Not a single word from any of you until I tell you to shout. Then shout!” (Joshua 6:10). What was it that invited God’s discipline of their parents over and over in the desert? Grumbling! If they had been allowed to talk while marching, they would have no doubt returned to the grumbling ways of their parents. Someone would have complained or voiced their fear, causing the whole army to question themselves or grumble.

God knows it is in our nature to do what we’ve always done or what was modeled for us, so he disciplines us in a way that forces us to take a different approach in order to overcome the past. That’s why he gives us opportunities to face the same challenges our parents faced or that we previously failed to overcome, so that we can try again and do it right this time. The obvious lesson for me, in this holiday season, is to overcome the temptation to grumble about my circumstances. If I have to fix the entire gluten free, dairy free, Thanksgiving meal in total silence, so be it – but I would rather shout my gratitude to God, because that is what gives me the victory over the enemy!

When God brings us back to familiar territory – whether pleasant or unpleasant – the Christian who wants to grow in spiritual maturity will learn to ask God, “What lesson are you wanting to complete in me?” God is not punishing us by allowing us to go through the same trials over and over again; he wants us to learn how to be overcomers through them, no matter how many times it takes. God created the world to operate in cycles of seasons. Every spring we have to prune in order to make way for new growth. Every summer we have to pull weeds or suffer the consequences. Every fall we choose whether to share our bounty or hoard it. Seasons and cycles repeat regularly because no matter how many times we fail to do something right, God wants to give us another chance. The Scriptures show us that God is able to help us overcome our weaknesses by the power of the Holy Spirit, but we must choose to believe and obey the Spirit. As God begins to rewire our thinking through daily exposure to the truth of God’s Word, eventually thought patterns change and cycles of behavior are broken (Romans 12:2). That is my testimony which I have chronicled on this blog.

So here we are, right before Thanksgiving, choosing to be thankful. This year, I will make our gluten free AND dairy free Thanksgiving dinner with a cheerful attitude, and give God thanks for the hope of healing that we have. This year, I will choose contentment with a pared-down Christmas celebration, once again, and praise God for what we have while sharing with those less fortunate. This year, I rejoice that God has rolled away the shame of my past and my son’s past, and given us hope for the future as we prepare to enter our Promised Land. This year, I choose joy in all circumstances, which was and still is the purpose of this blog. The cycle is complete.

“Now all glory to God, who is able, through his mighty power at work within us, to accomplish infinitely more than we might ask or think” (Ephesians 3:20).

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

We needed to be in the car in two minutes, so I called up the stairs to my daughter and told her to come down. “I can’t. My hair is all tangled and I can’t get the tangles out!” she replied in tearful frustration. My daughter has gorgeous, thick, long hair (which is a mystery to me because if I put my hair in a ponytail, it could fit in one of her orthodontic rubber bands). We learned the hard way that if you don’t brush it thoroughly every single day, it will get tangled underneath. She’d been sick the week before, and had let go of her grooming routine while resting in bed, so the tangles didn’t come as a surprise to me. I rushed upstairs to see if I could help, but quickly realized that this problem would not be solved in two minutes. So I smoothed the top of her hair down over the tangles as best I could and took her to school.

Life can get tangled in all sorts of ways, can’t it? Like my daughter’s hair, tangles are often a result of procrastination that we try to brush over with pride, hoping no one will notice. We put off balancing the budget for a couple weeks, then suddenly realize that we’ve spent our whole grocery budget and it’s only half-way through the month. So we start pulling money from other funds to cover our tracks, and tell the kids there’s no money for clothes or activities, when the truth is that there was money set aside but we spent it on impulse buys at the grocery store. Pride keeps us from dealing with the tangle, so we keep repeating the behavior and the tangle grows.

Or perhaps it’s our health that’s all tangled to the point of crisis. Pride makes us put off going to the dentist or taking care of that issue that’s been nagging at us because we don’t want to be scolded by a doctor for our failures or told to do something unpleasant. I finally took our dog to the vet last week because his ears smelled so disgusting that we couldn’t stand to have him in the same room with us. I initially put off taking him to the vet for financial reasons; when you’re barely scraping by, you don’t have $265 to spend on a dog. But even after our financial situation improved, I still put off taking him to the vet because I knew they would point out all the ways in which we have failed to take good care of him (and there are many). So our poor dog got tangled up in my pride and has probably had infected ears for years.

The thing about tangles is that they rarely just affect us. Other people get caught in our tangles when we keep ignoring the effects of our procrastination and pride. My son was almost late to school because of the extra time we spent trying to deal with my daughter’s hair. If the police had been watching for speeders that day, I would have been issued a ticket as I raced my kids to school. Our tangles rarely affect us alone. Even if we think we’re the only ones aware of our hidden tangles, the fact that something is wrong underneath will eventually affect our actions and attitudes in other areas and spill over into our relationships. After school, when I asked my daughter how her day was, she said it had been as bad as her hair that morning. It was time to deal with the tangle.

When we got home from school, I got out her comb and some conditioner, then sat her down in front of the fireplace and started working through the tangles while she watched a favorite show. As I wrestled with those tangles, I discovered they were matted with grime that had been missed in the shower. The only way to get the tangles out was to wash them. So I drew a bubble bath for her while she put on her swimsuit (because 13-year-old girls are the most modest people on the planet).

I lit a candle on the edge of the tub, and watched her slowly relax in the warm water as I washed and gently combed her hair. We talked about how I used bathe her when she was little, and as the memories of childhood washed over her, her spirits began to lift. After she dried off, I gave her a snack to eat while I braided her hair so it wouldn’t be dripping wet when we went to an appointment. Her entire countenance changed after that, and for the rest of the day she was joyful and content.

God spoke so powerfully to me through that experience, allowing me to give my daughter the gift of untangling that my Heavenly Father offers me when I bring him my mess. Sometimes it’s my circumstances that are a mess of procrastination entangled with pride, but sometimes the tangles are in my mind. Yesterday, God invited me to sit by the fireplace while he combed through the tangled mess of my views regarding food and their relationship to my health. It had not only entangled me, but my family and finances, and had grown into a twisted mess of controlling behaviors and slavery to food. In frustration, I cried out to God to fix what I could not seem to fix on my own. He gently separated out each strand of lies I’d believed that had been tangled with the truth in my mind, and washed them out with my tears of repentance and his healing balm of truth from the Scriptures.

God then invited me to choose whatever food I wanted to eat – not what I felt like I should eat, but what I really wanted to eat. While I ate, he began the process of retraining my thinking, much in the same way I’d trained my daughter’s hair into a braid. He would pull at one section of my long-held beliefs until we got to the root of it, then guide me to the truth. We traced many of my tangles back to my mother’s breast cancer when I was 5 years old. The truth that food is correlated to health was deeply entangled with the lie that by eating the “right” foods I can control my health (and the health of my family), which was also tangled with fear of what will happen if I don’t.

I was entangled in the belief that I must eat whatever “experts” say is healthy and avoid what isn’t – which we all know changes from week to week – so that I would not get cancer like my mom. But as God pulled on those strands, he shaped my thinking to reflect the truth that it was because of her cancer that she cried out to God and asked him for a sign if she would live to see her girls graduate from high school. The sign she asked for was a phone call from someone who had never called before. That person called within minutes. This story became not only a building block in my mom’s faith, but part of the bedrock of my belief that God hears and answers prayer. Where would my faith be without my mom’s cancer testimony? Where would my children’s faith be without my firm faith in God? My mother survived the cancer she had when she was 37, and went on to live another 37 years. If God was gracious to her in her weakness, will he not also be gracious to me if I should have to walk down that road?

Just as the memory of my lifelong care for her lifted my daughter’s spirits, and her braid kept her hair from tangling, training my mind to remember God’s constant provision for me and his promise to never leave me is what will keep me in perfect peace and protect my mind from getting tangled again.

I don’t know what tangles have come to your mind as you’ve been reading my story, but I know who is equipped to gently comb through them. God does not shame us when we come to him with our tangled mess. He says, “Oh child, come to me and rest awhile. Let me help you comb through this and be free.” We may cry a few tears because sometimes the tangles are painful to remove. Sometimes there is sin that must be washed out by Jesus’ blood that was shed for our sins, and it might take a lot of combing to remove the lies that led to our mess, but God’s discipline always brings healing and restoration when we cooperate with him. There is no tangle he cannot untangle.

I have heard Israel saying, “You disciplined me severely, like a calf that needs training for the yoke. Turn me again to you and restore me, for you alone are the Lord my God. I turned away from God, but then I was sorry. I kicked myself for my stupidity! I was thoroughly ashamed of all I did in my younger days.”

“Is not Israel still my son, my darling child?” says the Lord. I often have to punish him, but I still love him. That’s why I long for him and surely will have mercy on him.” – Jeremiah 31:18-20

Just as surely as God has been disciplining his children and restoring them with love and mercy since the beginning of time, God will have compassion on all those who bring their tangles to him. Come home, child, and be set free.

No more tangles!

Read Full Post »

I recently wrote about my experience of struggling to feed my growing kids on the expensive gluten free diet, and how my way of making ends meet was to give my food to my son. However, God had demonstrated time and time again that he is able to meet my needs, so why did I respond in this way? I think we all have blind spots in our lives. We see so clearly in some areas and are able to quickly see the error of our ways, but other broken ways may be so ingrained because of our personality and upbringing that we fail to notice how we’re sabotaging ourselves.

Jesus said that he is the light of the world. “If you follow me, you won’t have to walk in darkness, because you will have the light that leads to life” (John 8:12). We all have dark places where brokenness has not been mended and false beliefs have not been exposed to the truth. The truth that Jesus had to bring to light in order for my mind to be mended is this:

God does not ask me to do for him or others what he has not already done for me.

And this same God who takes care of me will supply all your needs from his glorious riches, which have been given to us in Christ Jesus. – Philippians 4:19

This principle of provision can be found over and over throughout the Scriptures. God promises his provision, then lays out his instructions for how we are to live in response as we trust him to provide for us. In the old covenant, God promised the provision of land, blessing, and his very presence to the Israelites, then laid out instructions for how his people should live in response to God as their provider and deliverer. The law was given to guide them to right living so they would learn how to relate to one another and to God, with reverence and obedience.

The law was our guardian until Christ came; it protected us until we could be made right with God through faith. – Galatians 3:24

The law trained the Israelites to consider God in every aspect of their lives, right down to what they ate and how they dressed. God wanted to be at the very center of everything they did so that they would seek him in everything they did. While God promised blessings for obedience, it was never their obedience to the law that made them prosper; it was God’s choice to prosper them because he chose to bless them and eventually bless all nations through them (in the person of Jesus, a Jew). Their obedience to the law was meant to show their dependence on God so that the nation of Israel would be an example through whom God would demonstrate to the surrounding nations that all power belongs to God and all provision comes from God.

God wanted to bless Israel and prove his might to other nations by enabling them to do in 6 days what others did in 7, so he instructed them to observe a Sabbath day of rest. God wanted to bless Israel and demonstrate his power of provision to other nations by showering them with abundant blessings as they gave back to God their tithe and lived off of 90% of their income. God’s instructions to us are not difficult to follow when we understand that he purposely positions us to be weak so that he can demonstrate his strength! He doesn’t ask us to tithe or rest in order to earn a blessing; he does it because we need opportunities to bear witness to God’s power and provision.

The self-sufficient person has no need of God, which is why there are so many Scriptures warning of the dangers of wealth. But to those who need God, he shows up with the promise of provision. Sometimes the provision is obvious ahead of time, and sometimes we don’t see it until after we respond to God out of faith in him as our provider. Our example for this kind of belief is Abraham, who was willing to sacrifice his son whom God had promised would be his heir, believing that God could bring him back to life.

God chose Abraham to bless and become the father of the nation of Israel because Abraham believed God when God made crazy, huge promises that wouldn’t be fulfilled in Abraham’s lifetime. Because of Abraham’s belief that God would do what he said he would do, God declared him righteous (Romans 4). The law wasn’t given until 430 years later to his descendants. Abraham did not have the law to make him righteous; he had belief. Just as God declared Abraham righteous because of his belief, we are made righteous by God through belief in Christ.

God sent Jesus to perfectly fulfill the law as both God and human, to show us how the law was supposed to be lived out, and provide both a model and means to right living. Through Jesus’ obedient life, death and resurrection, God made a provision for the requirements of the law to be fulfilled and internalized through the gift of the Holy Spirit. Christ fulfilled both ends of the old covenant, paying our penalty on the cross, and providing a way for us to be made right with God. Our entry point into this blessing and provision is the same as Abraham’s: belief.

Why is this such a big deal? Because if we are trying to earn God’s favor by following rules and working hard at acting righteous, we miss the whole point of God’s gift of salvation through Jesus. We’re making our walk with God all about us and what we do for God, instead of focusing on God and what he wants to do for us, in us, and through us as we respond to him with grateful hearts. We sometimes act like God hands us an empty bucket and asks us to fill it for him, when the opposite is true. He asks us to believe by faith that he has filled our bucket with living water that will never run dry (John 7:37-39).

God does not ask us to perfectly follow a set of rules in order to be saved. He asks us to believe that Jesus has provided all we need for salvation and a holy life. God doesn’t ask us to just do our best to make ends meet and dig ourselves out of the financial messes we’re in, he invites us into a relationship of dependency on him so that he can demonstrate his love and provision for us. Everything God asks us to do is in response to the provision he has already made for us to do it.

For God is working in you, giving you the desire and the power to do what pleases him. – Philippians 2:13

We so often fail to realize that the very desire we have to obey comes from God. Without God, we are selfish and destructive. However, when God gives us a desire to obey, he also provides the means for our obedience. He equips us to do every good work he asks us to do. God does not ask us to give from our poverty, but from trust in his abundance.

Shortly before his crucifixion, Jesus knealt down to wash his disciples’ feet. He told them,

Unless I wash you, you won’t belong to me. – John 13:8

Later, he tells them to go and do likewise. First, he models what God wants us to do. He then sends the Holy Spirit to equip his followers to do what he does. Every word of instruction in the Bible is preceded by the provision of God to do it. Church, we’ve got to move past this age-old idea that righteousness is something we do for God. Righteousness is the fruit of the Holy Spirit’s work in our lives as we yield to him. It is what God does in us as we believe in Jesus and remain in him. Yes, we need to obey, but it is not to earn God’s favor; it should be in response to God’s promise that he will supply all our needs if we just seek a relationship with him and trust in his provision (Matthew 6:31-33).

Oh friends, if we only knew how great and mighty is our God! Most of us come to church expecting to confront our list of sins over the past week, and be admonished to work harder and be better Christians. But what if the only sin God wants to confront is the sin of our unbelief?

Jesus told them, “This is the only work God wants from you: Believe in the one he has sent.” – John 6:29

What if we really believed that the God of the Bible is the same God today? What if our actions stemmed from the belief that God has provided everything we need through the Scriptures, the example of Christ and the work he accomplished on the cross, and the power of the Holy Spirit to guide and equip us for all good works? If we believe God supplies the provision to do whatever he asks us to do, then when the Holy Spirit whispers, “Give that homeless man $10,” we can obediently respond, “Thank you, God, for providing enough to meet my needs and the needs of others.” When we find ourselves struggling with anger, instead of berating ourselves for our failure to overcome a feeling, we simply respond, “Thank you, God, for creating me with emotions. Thank you for providing a way through Jesus and the gift of the Holy Spirit to keep me from sinning in my anger. Thank you for your forgiveness that enables me to forgive those who sin against me.” Do you see how confidence in God’s provision can be life-changing?

All we need for a life of godliness is belief that God is God, and that he will provide the means for our obedience to do whatever he asks us to do. We just need to pray for discernment to know how God would have us respond to the situations we face. Again, God has already provided the means for discernment through the Holy Spirit (John 16:13). We can confidently pray the promise from Psalm 32:8, trusting God to guide us along the path he has set out for us.

I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with my loving eye on you.

When Jesus shines his light on the dark places of our lives, and we respond, “I believe! Help me overcome my unbelief,” he is able to change those ingrained patterns of thought and behavior that lead to destruction. Jesus never shames us in our brokenness, but simply invites us to come and be healed. He is our provider, and nothing can separate us from his love.

Read Full Post »

God has been prompting me to earnestly pray for revival in the church for the last few months, but I have felt like there’s a block in my prayers, so I asked God to show me what it is. This series is God’s answer to me. There is so much shame in the church that God’s people have become numb to the voice of the Holy Spirit. God isn’t shaming us for failing to be perfect because, as I showed through scripture in Part 1, he has already made us perfect even as we are in the process of being made holy (Hebrews 10:14). But we have not believed in the power of the Holy Spirit to make us holy, nor have we trusted the Holy Spirit to make others holy. So we take up the chains of outward holiness through self-examination and determination to work harder.

However, as we discussed in Part 2, we cannot be holy and do good works apart from remaining in Christ and being filled with the Holy Spirit (John 15:4-5). Christians continually feel shamed for not measuring up to the admonitions in scripture whenever they’re invited to examine their lives to see where they fall short (because we will always find fault with ourselves when grace is not offered). But the description of the holy life as outlined in the Bible should cause us to rejoice that the One who calls us to be holy has promised to keep us blameless until he returns, and equip us to do good works as we remain in his love (1 Thess. 5:23-24)! Yet we feel like we are still under judgment because we have not believed that God can cleanse our conscience by Christ’s blood, so we continue to judge others by pointing out their faults and holding them to our standard of holiness – even though Jesus warned that if we judge, we too will be judged. Our judgment of others and unforgiveness are the true root of our shame issue in the church, and we need to be set free from this captivity so that the Bride of Christ will, once again, fall in love with the Bridegroom. 

Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. (Matthew 7:1-2, NIV)

The enemy knows that we are not to judge, so when we judge others – especially those in the church who fall short of our personal standard of holiness – he will harass us with shame. (As children of God, the enemy cannot possess us on the inside, but he can oppress us from the outside.) We know that judgment has brought us into enemy territory when we feel toxic emotions, like shame, because the enemy’s work produces fear-based emotions. When we feel rage, malice, shame, greed, lust, jealousy, these are all based on fear (that God’s grace, sovereignty, and provision are not enough) and show that the enemy is at work. But God is greater than the enemy, and has the perfect weapon to drive out our fearful thoughts and emotions: his love.

There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love. (1 John 4:18, NKJV)

Until we allow the love of God to cast out our fear, we will continue to be tormented by the enemy, which is why the greatest commandment is: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength” (Mark 12:30). When we love God and are filled with his love, there is no room for fear! The first step to exiting enemy territory is to acknowledge God’s sovereignty over all of us and lay down our judgment of one another. This requires us to love the Lord with all our mind and strength – our will – because it does not come naturally. Loving God with our will means that we follow the example of Christ, who prayed:

Not my will, but yours be done. (Luke 22:42)

Jesus continually submitted his will to the Father, and remained in the Father’s love. He asks us to do the same. “When you obey my commandments, you remain in my love, just as I obey my Father’s commandments and remain in his love” (John 15:10). This means that we will God’s will toward others. We remain in his love so that his love will be expressed through our lives. We don’t need to accept every negative and judgmental thought that enters our mind! As we remain in Jesus and his words remain in us through the infilling of the Holy Spirit, we are empowered and equipped to take negative thoughts captive and speak truth to the lies of the enemy.

We take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ. (2 Corinthians 10:5, NIV)

How do we know when we need to take a thought captive? When we are tempted to judge, we will recognize that the tempter is at work because we will feel ugly inside. We just feel…off, icky. This is our cue that we need to release judgement to the Judge, so that we don’t open ourselves up to guilt and shame. We thank God for his grace and receive it, so that we can extend it.

In this series, I’ve been focusing on shame because the church has (unintentionally, I hope) historically embraced shaming and judgment as a way of motivating good works and outward holiness, which has caused people to withdraw from God and point fingers at others, rather than lean in to God and receive grace. (I say this not to judge church leaders, for whom God’s grace abounds, but to shed light on why so many in the church feel under condemnation, so that healing can take place.) The Apostle Paul warned against this type of religion, saying,

They will act religious, but they will reject the power that could make them godly. Stay away from people like that! (2 Timothy 3:5, NLT)

The power that makes us godly is the infilling of the Holy Spirit through remaining in Christ, not our attempts to appear holy through conformity to rules! We need to recognize that a continual feeling of shame after one has already repented and been forgiven of sins is a stronghold of the enemy. But shame is not the only stronghold the enemy can have over us. A stronghold is any area where the enemy is holding you captive. But God has equipped us to demolish them by his power!

The weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds. (2 Cor. 10:4)

So how do we demolish the enemy’s stronghold of fear and shame? The way out of fear-based emotions that allows God’s kingdom of peace to rule our hearts is simple – but by no means easy. In addition to releasing judgment and aligning our will to God’s, we must love God with all our heart and soul. We must surrender the very seat of our emotions to him. We must invite God to tear down the walls of fear and judgment that we put around our hearts as a form of self-protection, and allow his love and strength to be our fortress instead. How do we do this? With the most powerful weapon God has.

FORGIVENESS.

For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins. (Matthew 6:14-15)

We all know that we are supposed to forgive because Christ forgave us, but the reason why forgiveness is the primary weapon we will use to tear down strongholds is that it is our unforgiveness that can allow a stronghold to take root. If we have felt judged and shamed in the church, and allowed a bitter root of unforgiveness to form a wall of resentment around our hearts, we must forgive those who (again, hopefully unintentionally) wronged us. Otherwise, our hardened heart will be hardened to the Holy Spirit. Jesus said, in the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (who refused to show mercy by throwing in prison the one who was indebted to him after being forgiven an even greater debt):

“Shouldn’t you have had mercy on your fellow servant just as I had on you?” In anger his master handed him over to the jailers to be tortured, until he should pay back all he owed. This is how my heavenly Father will treat each of you unless you forgive your brother or sister from your heart. (Matthew 18:33-35)

When we refuse to forgive those who have sinned against us, we allow a jail cell – a stronghold – of our own making to surround us. The enemy knows we have been instructed to forgive, so he has legal grounds to torment us (v. 34). If we want to break free from the enemy’s strongholds in our life – fear, shame, lust, greed, jealousy, pride, addictions – we must learn how to forgive “from our heart” so that we can walk out of the jail cell and torment for good!

How can we forgive from our heart? I chose to post this on Good Friday, the day we remember Christ’s sacrifice for us on the cross, so that we would look to Jesus’s example of how to forgive as he hung on the cross, crucified by the very ones he died to save. Jesus prayed,

Father, forgive them, for they don’t know what they are doing. (Luke 23:34)

Learning to pray this is how Jesus has set me free from the enemy’s stronghold of fear and shame. I was tormented by insecurity and anxiety around people for almost 35 years. It began with bullying in elementary school, and brokenness from girls led me to seek my security from boys – which is about the dumbest thing a girl can do because what teenage boy can meet a girl’s need for security? – leading to even more brokenness. Wounding led to more wounding and a victim mentality that could send me into a panic with any fear trigger. Continually hearing messages highlighting how I fell short of Christian perfection in my behavior led me into a stronghold of shame. Surely God was as disappointed in me as I was in myself, I thought.

But then I fell in love with Jesus. I learned to recognize the voice of the Good Shepherd, and he did not speak words of shame. His words brought life and peace. He began to renew my mind with scripture as I loved him with my mind through studying his Word. As I worshiped him out of love for his sacrifice for me, he filled me more and more with his love through the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit would then bring his words to mind when the enemy attacked, so that I would learn how to fight lies with truth. This went on for several years.

Then one day I prayed the prayer that would change everything. I had forgiven those who had sinned against me and caused wounding before, but only as a victim who laid down her right to press charges. One day, I felt led by the Holy Spirit to pray a prayer of repentance on behalf of those who had sinned in the past, causing destruction in my life. (I later discovered the power in this kind of prayer in Daniel 9.) I then prayed that God would forgive them – that his forgiveness would flow through me to them – for they did not know what they were doing. I forgave those in my ancestry who allowed the stronghold of insecurity to be passed down to me. I forgave those in the church who unknowingly taught me to question my security with God and doubt that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been given to me. I forgave all those who led me to broken behavior out of brokenness of heart because they couldn’t possibly know the consequences of their actions. In doing so, I stepped out of the victim’s chair and became the attorney for the defense, pleading with the Judge to have mercy on them as he has had mercy on me. I prayed for those who had persecuted me with full faith in my good Father to work in all things for my good.

And my chains fell off.

I no longer have a victim mentality because I have stepped out of that role. The enemy no longer torments me with fear, shame, rejection, or loneliness. You know who is my BFF? Jesus! The day he showed me that he is my friend who satisfies every longing, I literally felt the hand of God reach down into the pit of my soul – the seat of my emotions – and pull out every ugly, fearful emotion the enemy had tortured me with nearly my entire life.

I
AM
FREE!

I am free to love God with all my heart and rest in his love for me. I am free to see and love people as Christ sees and loves them – and I love people like I have never loved before, free from the need for them to love me back. There have been times when the enemy has tried to suck me back into fear, but God has taught me to immediately take fearful thoughts captive and speak the truth of God’s Word over them. It’s like being coated with petroleum jelly so that the enemy can’t get a good grip! As I daily remain in Christ through worship, prayer, and receiving his love and wisdom through the Bible, he shows me how to sidestep the enemy’s attempts at captivity by refusing to read/watch/listen to that which feeds fear.

Fix your thoughts on what is true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely, and admirable. Think about things that are excellent and worthy of praise...Then the God of peace will be with you. (Philippians 4:8-9)

But what if someone did know what they were doing and is intentionally harming you? Forgiveness does not mean that we have to allow people to continue to do evil to us. In the same chapter he talks about forgiveness, Jesus also instructed us to confront those who sin against us – privately, if at all possible – and try to work out a solution so that relationship will be restored. After exhausting every peaceable option, we turn to the courts, if it is a legal offense. But then he immediately reminds us that we are to forgive – even as we seek an end to the injustice – so that we are not tormented over it by the enemy.

Friend, I know you’ve been hurt – we all have. Some of us have been hurt by the church, but as we cling to unforgiveness, we hinder the Holy Spirit’s ability to restore us to the kingdom of peace. When we forgive by simply dropping our right to prosecute, we can secretly hang onto the hope that God will still get them in the end. We still cling to vengeance; we just step aside and hope that God will avenge us. That’s why Jesus said to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us, so that we will remain in his love at all times. All emotions that flow from God are love-based. As God’s forgiveness and love flows through us, the natural result is that we will his love toward others, and the Fruit of the Spirit is developed in us. Willing love – not hate – toward others, and releasing all judgment to the merciful Judge, is what shuts the door on the enemy. When we are obedient to dwell in God’s love, yielding our will to his will that none should perish but have eternal life, the enemy has no grounds to harass us. That is how we live in continual victory, free from strongholds, free from fear!

There is no hurt worth hanging onto if it keeps you from full victory in Christ. I don’t say that flippantly. I know it’s hard to release judgment and forgive the way Christ forgave because I’ve done it, but he is The Way, The Truth, and The Life (John 14:6). A life of fear and torment is not the life Christ died to give us. It is for freedom that we have been set free. So how do we walk in freedom? By allowing God’s forgiveness to flow through you, because it is only by his power and grace that we can forgive. Here is how God is teaching me to continually walk in peace and freedom:

  1. When a toxic, fear-based emotion surfaces – or you feel like your soul is not at peace – ask the Lord to show you what is causing it (a memory, a person, a particular circumstance), and where it began. If it is a circumstance that is causing you to fear, yield it to God by saying, “May your will be done. I release judgment and ask You to cast out my fear with your perfect love.” If a person is involved, ask God to show you who it was that wounded you or failed to meet a need you had. (Addictions and other toxic emotions like lust, insecurity, or greed can take root when a legitimate need for love, protection, or provision wasn’t met.)
  2. If you have put up a guard over your heart to prevent feeling hurt by that person or memory, ask God to remove the wall so you can feel the emotion and be healed. (Sometimes we just feel “off” because we’ve trained ourselves to not feel any emotion in that situation anymore.)
  3. As soon as you feel the root emotion, ask God to heal and cleanse your wound as you release forgiveness.
  4. Pray “Father, forgive them, for they did not know what they were doing,” and ask God’s forgiveness to flow through you to them. (Even if they intentionally tried to hurt you – just like those who crucified Christ – we can assume they did not know they were in danger of the wrath of God who demands justice. God is still the Judge and may, in fact, be already dealing with them for their wrongdoing, but because you are obediently choosing God’s way, he will bless you with peace. Forgiveness is about gaining your freedom, not theirs.)
  5. If the toxic feeling is shame or regret, you may need to first ask God to forgive you. If you have already done this and forgiven others involved, then thank God for his forgiveness, which is a way of praying in faith that if you have asked God for forgiveness, he remembers your sin no more (Hebrews 10:17-18). However, the person you may still need to forgive is yourself. Allow God’s forgiveness to flow through you to cleanse you from your own self-condemnation.
  6. If you feel like God was the one who let you down, forgive God and ask him to show you how he was acting on your behalf during that season of wounding.
  7. Receive God’s healing in this area until you feel at peace or feel led to pray over a different issue. (He may bring several to your mind, if the root goes deep.)
  8. If a lie was introduced at the time of emotional wounding, ask the Holy Spirit to show you what it was and then speak God’s truth over the lie. Whenever you are confronted with that lie, take that thought captive and make it obey Christ, the Truth.
  9. Continue in an attitude of prayer until you feel the peace of God guarding your heart and mind in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:7).

This was a time-consuming process, at first, but I have learned to live in continual victory by doing this quickly whenever I do not feel at peace. I can’t begin to tell you what a difference it has made in my life to shut the door on the voice of condemnation, and be empowered by the Holy Spirit to step into the life of love God has called me to live. It has affected my marriage, my parenting, my friendships, my finances – every part of my life as I yield it all to God.

In Part 4 of this series, I will review the spiritual weapons or tools God has given us that enable us to walk in continual freedom. Yes, it is possible to be free from strongholds – even generational strongholds. Yes, we can live at peace with others as we draw near to God and allow his forgiving nature to become our nature. Yes, we WILL do good works as we remain in Christ because he promised that he would equip us for love and good deeds by the power of the Holy Spirit that resides in us. To Him be all glory and honor and praise!

Read Full Post »

In Part 1 of this series, we looked in depth at the truth that Christ’s blood has the power to cleanse us from a guilty conscience and has already “forever made perfect those who are (in the process of) being made holy” (Hebrews 10:14). We do not need to embrace words of shame and condemnation over our mistakes as we walk with the Lord because if we are his children, he has cleansed us from a desire to sin, even though he must continue to address and heal the broken parts of our lives that lead to broken actions.

Those who have been born into God’s family do not make a practice of sinning, because God’s life is in them. So they can’t keep on sinning, because they are children of God. (1 John 3:9, NLT)

Therefore, we do not need to anxiously examine our lives for sin, feel shame when we make mistakes while God is in the process of making us holy, or embrace a theology based on works in order to gain God’s favor. So how do we balance that knowledge with all the scriptures that admonish us to do good works and behave like Jesus?

Our actions will show that we belong to the truth, so we will be confident when we stand before God. Even if we feel guilty, God is greater than our feelings, and he knows everything. Dear friends, if we don’t feel guilty, we can come to God with bold confidence. And we will receive from him whatever we ask because we obey him and do the things that please him. (1 John 3:19-22)

I believe most Christians interpret verse 19 as saying “our actions should show that we belong to the truth,” as if God is shaking his finger at us. But it actually promises that if we belong to Christ – The Truth – our actions “will show that we belong to the truth, so we will be confident when we stand before God”! Even if we feel guilty – not guilt from God, but our own self-condemnation – God’s love should be trusted more than our feelings because he knows exactly what broken part of you caused you to do that thing that doesn’t line up with Christ’s character, and he already has a plan for how and when he’s going to address it and restore you. Glory to God! If we don’t feel guilty, and can trust God’s patient love for us, we will ask bold things of God and do good works because we’re confident that we are obeying him to the best of our ability (which is always growing in grace). This is exactly why the enemy wants us to fix our eyes on ourselves through guilt and shame, because it keeps us from bold faith and contains us. He wants to roll a stone of shame to seal you in a tomb of regret and hopelessness, but we serve a God of hope who rolls away stones! Hallelujah!

In Part 2 of this series, I want to look at how we can live a life of obedience that is yielded to God, but free of shame:

  1. By learning to be less focused on the “cross we must bear” for God, and more focused on the cross he bore for us.
  2. By embracing the requirement to remain in Christ as the key to obedience and “bearing fruit.”
  3. By rightly understanding the roles and power of the Holy Spirit who is essential to our obedience.

Most of us are familiar with Jesus’s words to his disciples that if they are to follow him, they must deny themselves and take up their cross. We often treat this as though it’s a prerequisite of discipleship, but it is simply the natural progression that as we serve Christ out of love and become more like him, we will naturally follow in his steps – steps that sometimes take us to difficult, painful places. But in those places we are never alone! We must always keep the cross of Christ first and foremost in our minds because when my eyes are fixed on myself and “my cross that I must bear,” I open up my life to the Accuser to:

  1. cast blame over the areas where I’ve fallen short of perfection in the eyes of men,
  2. introduce the lie that God is only pleased when I am suffering for him, and
  3. inflate pride over the areas where I’ve been “suffering for Jesus,” which leads further into legalism and is toxic to my relationship with Christ.

But when I keep my eyes fixed on Jesus who, according to Hebrews 12:2, is both the author and PERFECTER of my faith who endured the cross “for the joy set before him,” I am overwhelmed by the love of my Savior who endured the cross, scorning it’s shame, for me. Jesus began my faith and he is in the process of perfecting it, so I do not need to look within and focus on that which is not yet perfected in my eyes. I need to look up so that I am receiving his perfect love that has the power to transform me. You and I were “the joy set before him” as he hung on the cross. He died and rose again so that you and I could remain in his LOVE forever! And this causes me to fall down and worship him in gratitude as his sacrifice becomes greater in my eyes than my own. When we bow down before Christ’s cross, we are in a posture of worship that enables us to receive God’s love and return it. Worship opens the door to the infilling of the Holy Spirit and shuts the door to the enemy. All Jesus asks is that I remember to keep HIS sacrifice before me (through the sacrament of communion) and remain in his love.

Remain in me, and I will remain in you. For a branch cannot produce fruit if it is severed from the vine, and you cannot be fruitful unless you remain in me. Yes, I am the vine; you are the branches. Those who remain in me, and I in them, will produce much fruit. For apart from me you can do nothing. (John 15:4-5)

We remain blameless by remaining in Christ. Shame makes us keep working harder to do good works because we assume fruitfulness means busyness, when simply remaining in relationship with Jesus may reveal that God’s will for you in this season is to rest in him.

Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.” (Matthew 11:28-30).

Yes, if we love Jesus we will obey him, but his burdens are light because we are yoked to him and equipped to do everything he asks of us by his power. Sometimes obedience means laying down some of the stuff we’re trying to do for him out of guilt (and outside the yoke of his provision), so that we can make room in our schedules to spend time with him and remain in his love. Sometimes obedience means going off to a quiet place to pray, like Jesus did. When we are yoked to him, he decides when we move and when we rest in him; what goes on the calendar and what gets taken off. The more we remain in Christ through worship, prayer, and reading scriptures with a yielded heart, the more we will bear fruit: the Fruit of the Holy Spirit!

The Holy Spirit produces this kind of fruit in our lives: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. (Galatians 5:22-23)

The Fruit of the Spirit is the very character and nature of Christ. It is the first and most important fruit God wants to develop in us because it is from this inward fruit that all of the outward fruit in ministry is produced. We only become like him as we spend time with him, which is why we can do nothing apart from remaining in him. As we remain in him we learn to recognize the voice of the Good Shepherd and distinguish his from that of the Accuser.

My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one can snatch them away from me, for my Father has given them to me, and he is more powerful than anyone else. No one can snatch them from the Father’s hand. (John 10:27-29).

When we confidently know God’s voice and trust that he is able to keep us securely in his mighty hands, then we can read admonitions in scripture regarding holy behavior with joy instead of shame, because we know we have already yielded our heart to Christ and have received the promised Holy Spirit who empowers us to live a holy life to our Father’s glory!

When the Father sends the Advocate as my representative—that is, the Holy Spirit—he will teach you everything and will remind you of everything I have told you. I am leaving you with a gift—peace of mind and heart. And the peace I give is a gift the world cannot give. So don’t be troubled or afraid (John 14:26-27).

One of the reasons why Christians feel troubled and afraid is that they do not rightly understand what a big deal the gift of the Holy Spirit is, but Jesus knew. He told his disciples not to worry about him leaving them because he was going to send them an even better gift, the Holy Spirit! In fact, he warned them not to leave Jerusalem until they had received it because he knew they would be powerless to carry out his commands without the Holy Spirit. And so are we. The gift of the Holy Spirit:

  • frees us from condemnation by setting us free from the power of sin (Romans 8:1-2)
  • reminds us of what Jesus – the Living Word of God – has said; operating as The Counselor, he helps us recall the scriptures and promises of God at the time we need them (John 14:26-27)
  • equips us for spiritual warfare the way Jesus fought Satan’s temptations (Matthew 4:1-11), helping us wield “The Sword of the Spirit” as we speak God’s Word with efficacy against the enemy’s plan for us and pray in the Spirit (Ephesians 6:13-18)
  • gives us the “mind of Christ” (1 Corinthians 2:15-16) as we read God’s Word by showing us not just God’s promises for all men, but specific words for us from the Bible that will help us discern God’s will for our lives (Romans 12:2)
  • guards our heart and mind with peace as we trust in God alone to meet our needs (Philippians 4:7)
  • manifests the character of Christ in us, the Fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23)
  • enables us to do that which God calls us to do (1 Corinthians 12:4-11, Philippians 2:13)
  • empowers us to live a blameless life and dwell in God’s Kingdom of peace by sanctifying us, and so much more!

May God himself, the God of peace, sanctify you through and through. May your whole spirit, soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. The one who calls you is faithful, and he will do it. (1 Thessalonians 5:23-24)

The same power that raised Jesus from the dead has been gifted to us so that we may become like Christ as we are filled with his Spirit, and do his good works through the anointing of his Spirit. Remaining in Christ means that I remain open to the infilling of the Holy Spirit, respond with a yielded heart to whatever and wherever the Spirit leads, and trust that in doing so I am kept blameless. We don’t need to search ourselves for faults and open the door to the Accuser to cast blame. Instead, we pray the prayer of David, “Search me, O God, and know my heart,” trusting that the God who knit us together and knows everything about us is faithful to fill us with his Holy Spirit and lead us into all righteousness (Psalm 139).

If we do not feel empowered by the Holy Spirit, we don’t need to try harder or pray harder for God to give us what is already our spiritual inheritance (Ephesians 1:3-13). We need to recognize that the enemy is doing everything in his power to contain us through shame and keep us in his kingdom of fear so that we will doubt God’s power in us. But “the Spirit who lives in you is greater than the spirit who lives in the world” (1 John 4:4). It’s time we pick up our Sword and ask God to roll the stone away! You and I have the power of the Holy Spirit to shut the enemy up as we remain in Christ.

In Part 3 of this series, we will take a closer look at how we stray into the enemy’s kingdom of fear, and how we can get out and stay out by using the weapons God has given us to tear down strongholds.

The weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds. We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ. (2 Cor. 10:4-5)

Read Full Post »

I made a statement in my Sunday School class, recently, about how I used to always feel worse about myself after church than I did before I went in. As I looked around the room, heads were nodding up and down, so I know I am not alone in this experience. I have always had a tender heart toward God from the time I was a little girl, and I remember going to the altar weekly as young as first grade, which is likely when I gave my heart to the Lord. As a teenager, I responded to every altar call to “recommit” my life to God, and was always aware of how I fell short as a Christian. I desperately wanted to live the holy life that was preached from the pulpit, but it seemed so elusive, and I felt certain that I was a constant disappointment to God. Every time I was admonished to examine my heart I found fault and was certain God did too. I felt shame, condemnation, and hopeless that I would ever be good enough to not feel a guilty conscience in church. (But before I go further into my story, let me say I have no condemnation toward my pastors or teachers because it was not their plan for me to feel this way; it was the devil’s, and he is the enemy in this series, not church leaders.)

My family is currently reading through the Bible, and as God’s timing would have it, we have landed in the book of Leviticus during Holy Week. Let me just say up front that it does not bless my 12 and 15-year-old to read about ritual cleansing of infectious skin diseases and grotesque sacrifices. But we are reading it anyway because otherwise it’s too easy to forget the sacrificial system that Jesus replaced through his death on the cross. In order to appreciate the second covenant and understand what Jesus did for us, we must study the first. The sacrificial system had no power to keep God’s people blameless. In fact, the Levitical laws (pertaining to ritual cleansing and sacrifice) were meant to make us aware of how we fall short of God’s holiness. The sacrifices were needed in order to make atonement for sin, but they had to continually be offered day after day, year after year. God set up sacrifices to even cover unintentional sins (Leviticus 5:17-19). Try to imagine how discouraging it would be to see an animal slaughtered for your sins that you didn’t even mean to commit, but once you have become aware of your guilt you must pay the penalty. “The gifts and sacrifices being offered were not able to clear the conscience of the worshiper” (Hebrews 9:9). Imagine knowing that God is so holy you have no hope of being righteous, even if you followed every command to the best of your ability.

Actually, most of us can easily imagine this because even as Christians under the new covenant, we still act like we’re under the old. Why? The enemy has blinded us to the fact that we have been sprinkled by the blood of Christ – the perfect sacrifice that put an end to the old sacrificial system – and have been made holy in the eyes of God.

The blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a heifer sprinkled on those who are ceremonially unclean sanctify them so that they are outwardly clean. How much more, then, will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself unblemished to God, cleanse our consciences from acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God! (Hebrews 9:13-14)

The old sacrificial system could only make people outwardly clean, but the new covenant through Christ’s blood shed for us has the ability to cleanse our conscience. However, we have to receive this cleansing. Unfortunately, many of us in the church are convinced that what God wants from us is outward cleansing. So we stand just outside the gates of the Kingdom of Heaven, trying to wash ourselves off with the hose of guilt over our shortcomings. We believe the lie that if we just keep scrubbing and cleansing ourselves on the outside, we can finally be good enough to be accepted into the Kingdom. But the King has already invited us to enter through the Gate, Jesus Christ. He desires to cleanse us from the inside so that we are set free from a guilty conscience. However, the enemy has ensnared God’s people in a trap of guilt and condemnation because he knows that once our consciences are cleansed, we will “serve the living God” (v. 14).

The devil wants us to believe that Christ’s sacrifice for our sins was not enough to keep us right with God. Oh sure, we can be saved by grace, but he wants us to believe that grace is only sufficient for salvation and cannot keep us blameless. If the enemy can keep Christians focused on ourselves and our failings by encouraging us to look within and feel shame, he knows that we will:

  1. Never experience the full joy and freedom of victory over sin through Jesus, or even believe it’s possible
  2. Never live up to our full potential and effectiveness in our work, family, and church
  3. Trade the life of peace God offers for one of continual works that keep us exhausted and burned out
  4. Run from God when we make mistakes, instead of drawing near to God for restoration
  5. Become numb to the Holy Spirit because we can’t distinguish God’s gentle voice from our own harsh criticism
  6. Live in fear of God’s judgment, rather than peace in God’s Kingdom (and we’ll discuss later in this series why fear and peace cannot coexist in our lives because fear takes us into the enemy’s territory)

The devil cannot take away our salvation, but he can try to limit our effectiveness by keeping us focused on our guilt within. That’s why it’s so important for God’s people to understand what Christ’s sacrifice means for us, and the power that Jesus has over the enemy, so that we’ll stop agreeing with the Accuser and start agreeing with God!

Under the old covenant, the priest stands and ministers before the altar day after day, offering the same sacrifices again and again, which can never take away sins. But our High Priest offered himself to God as a single sacrifice for sins, good for all time. Then he sat down in the place of honor at God’s right hand. There he waits until his enemies are humbled and made a footstool under his feet. For by that one offering he forever made perfect those who are being made holy. (Hebrews 10:11-14)

The enemy knows the day is coming when he will be humbled and made a footstool for Jesus, so he is hard at work trying to trip up God’s people and make them feel like they need to be saved again and again. God’s sacrifice for your sin and mine was once and for all – all our sins, even the unintentional ones we commit in our weakness. If the old covenant provided sacrifices for unintentional sins, why do we think the new covenant is powerless to cleanse us from guilt over our failings? By that one offering, Jesus “forever made perfect those who are being made holy” (v. 14). Let that sink in. Jesus’s one sacrifice makes us perfect forever in God’s eyes, even as we are in the process of being made holy. And how does God make us holy?

“This is the new covenant I will make with my people on that day,” says the Lord:
“I will put my laws in their hearts, and I will write them on their minds.” Then he says, “I will never again remember their sins and lawless deeds.” And when sins have been forgiven, there is no need to offer any more sacrifices. (Hebrews 10:16-18)

If we are made perfect and are being made holy, we do not need to continue in a life of guilt and shame, trying to earn God’s favor through determination to work harder and be a “better” Christian. When God writes his laws on our minds through time spent in his Word (Romans 12:2), and on our hearts as we yield to the gentle leadership of the Holy Spirit in prayer, there will be times when we will become aware that we need God’s grace and power to perfect us in our weakness (2 Cor. 12:9). This is how we are “being made holy,” as we immediately agree with God and yield to the Holy Spirit within instead of yielding to external guilt and shame. There is no condemnation as we are in the process of being made holy (Romans 8:1), only continual grace and restoration as we gradually become more and more like him.

God is not impatiently waiting for you to hurry up and get sanctified. Believe it or not, he enjoys the process of making us holy because this holiness happens as we are in relationship with him. And that’s the purpose of Christ’s sacrifice for us, to restore us to relationship with our Creator. God does not require more sacrifices from us – continually going to the altar to “recommit” our lives to God – just continual relationship with Jesus Christ who paid the price so that God will never again remember our sins. The enemy wants us to remember our sins. He wants to keep our failings front and center in our eyes in order to trample the grace and power of God in our lives. He wants us to be insecure in our standing with God because then we are not a threat to him. But God’s children are not meant to live this way.

And so, dear brothers and sisters, we can boldly enter heaven’s Most Holy Place because of the blood of Jesus. By his death, Jesus opened a new and life-giving way through the curtain into the Most Holy Place. And since we have a great High Priest who rules over God’s house, let us go right into the presence of God with sincere hearts fully trusting him. For our guilty consciences have been sprinkled with Christ’s blood to make us clean, and our bodies have been washed with pure water. Let us hold tightly without wavering to the hope we affirm, for God can be trusted to keep his promise. (Hebrews 10:19-23)

And what is God’s promise? That he will make us holy and remember our sins no more. If God remembers our sins no more, then why do we? We need to allow our guilty consciences to be sprinkled with Christ’s blood and made clean. And we need to stop feeding our guilty conscience by assuming every word of rebuke we hear is for us. (I’ll explain how to do this later in this series.) We need to encourage one another so that we will not grow discouraged in our faith (Hebrews 10:25). Instead of thinking of how to motivate one another toward guilt and repentance, we need to think of ways to motivate one another toward love and good deeds (Hebrews 10:24). And how did Jesus motivate people? By loving them. That’s how the world will know we’re his disciples, after all. We forgive as Christ forgave us (something we’ll look at in detail in Part 3). We love because he first loved us, and because he has poured out his love into our hearts by the power of the Holy Spirit (and it’s this power that keeps us blameless, which we’ll discuss in Part 2). We step into the light and receive cleansing from Christ so that we can be free from guilt and shame.

Christ has truly set us free. Now make sure that you stay free, and don’t get tied up again in slavery to the law. (Galatians 5:1)

In Part 2 of this series, we’ll look at how we yield to God, rather than yield to the enemy, so we can move into a place of victory and blamelessness.

In Part 3, we’ll look at how the enemy holds us captive, and how we can follow Jesus’s example to be completely set free from negative emotions and strongholds.

 

Read Full Post »