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Posts Tagged ‘breads’

After a lovely summer of letting my children forage for their breakfast most days, I decided to celebrate our first cool, fall day with some I-can’t-believe-these-are-gluten-free ooey, gooey, caramel sticky buns. My family loves cinnamon rolls, but as those are tricky to make gluten free and require a lot of work, these little bites of heaven satisfy their desire for sweet rolls and my desire to not curse while baking.

Now if you are a more recent follower of my blog, you’ve probably come to expect low sugar, grain free or otherwise healthy recipes from me. This recipe is…um…not those things. But sometimes you need a recipe that will knock the socks off of a gluten-free skeptic, and so I feel obligated to share with you the mouth-watering result of my combining and tweaking the Namaste biscuit and Pillsbury Caramel Sticky Bun recipes. Happy fall baking (or whatever excuse you need to make these)!

Sticky Buns

Biscuit Ingredients:
2/3 c. milk + 2 tsp. white vinegar (to make buttermilk)
1 egg
1/2 c. very cold butter
2 c. Namaste Flour Blend (or other GF flour blend + 1 tsp. xanthan gum)
1 T. sugar
1 T. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt (I just eyeballed a scant tsp.)
1/8 tsp. baking soda (omit if using other milk besides buttermilk)

Biscuit Coating:
1/3 c. sugar
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3 T. butter, melted

Caramel Topping:
1/4 c. butter
1/4 c. brown sugar
2 T. maple syrup
1/2 tsp. vanilla (vanilla flavoring, not vanilla extract)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Pop the 1/2 c. butter for the biscuits in the freezer to get it nice and cold. Put the 3 T. butter for the biscuit coating in a microwave safe bowl and set aside. Combine the sugar and cinnamon for the biscuit coating in another bowl and set aside.

In a 1 c. liquid measuring cup, combine 2/3 c. milk with 2 tsp. white vinegar and stir to make buttermilk. (Using buttermilk really does make a difference in the texture of the biscuits, but if you need to use a dairy free milk, skip this step and omit the vinegar and baking soda.) Set aside.

In a large bowl, use a fork to combine the flour (plus xanthan gum if using a GF blend that does not contain any xanthan or guar gum), sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda (only if using buttermilk, which is needed to activate the soda). Take the butter out of the freezer and chop it into 8 slices, cutting each of those into quarters until it’s all in little cubes.

Toss half of the cubes in the flour mixture with the fork to coat. (This makes it easier to cut in butter without it all sticking together.) Using a pastry blender or two knives, start cutting in the butter. Add the remaining cubes and coat with flour, then cut in the butter until it is all in pea-sized or smaller crumbles. (And when you’re all done, recall that you have a food processor in the garage that is meant to make short work of projects such as this, then kick yourself for not remembering sooner.)

Place the 1/4 c. butter for the caramel topping in an ungreased, deep 8″x8″ pan and pop it in the oven to melt while you form the biscuits. (You really do need a pan with deep sides because the caramel will bubble up, and I can tell you from personal experience what a travesty it is to have the precious, yummy caramel bubble over onto the oven liner, making the whole house smell like burnt sugar for days. Heed this warning, gentle reader, lest ye suffer likewise.)

Crack the egg into the buttermilk and mix well with a fork. Stir this into the flour mixture with the fork until just combined. Place a little extra flour in a measuring cup to dip your fingers in to keep the biscuit dough from sticking to them. With floured fingers, pull off  2-3 T.-sized chunks of dough and roll into a ball, then gently flatten into a smallish biscuit on a piece of waxed paper. (The size/number is up to you; the smaller the biscuit, the more surface area is covered with sugar and the more servings you have. I ended up with 15.) Continue until all the dough is rolled into biscuits, occasionally checking on the butter in the oven to see if it’s melted.

Remove pan with melted butter from the oven (before it browns). Stir in the brown sugar until it dissolves. Add maple syrup and vanilla. Stir until you have a buttery caramel, occasionally swatting away fingers of children who wish to sample the caramel.

Melt butter for biscuit coating in the microwave, about 30 seconds. Dip biscuits into the butter, then coat in the sugar/cinnamon mixture you set aside AGES ago. (We’re almost there!!) Place biscuits on top of the caramel mixture in the pan, overlapping as necessary to make them all fit.

Bake 20-25 minutes until golden and biscuits are no longer doughy in the center. Let cool for 2 minutes (while you pour a cup of coffee or heat some sausage to serve with these in an effort to avert a sugar-coma).

Place an upside-down pretty serving plate on top of the pan (so your family will recognize that this is a special occasion and acknowledge your efforts accordingly) and, using oven mitts – duh – carefully invert the pan onto the serving plate. Spoon any remaining caramel from the pan onto the rolls (or save it for yourself as a reward for later if your family fails to give you the proper praise). Serve immediately.

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Turn on the oven, friends, because in 30 minutes you could be devouring delicious, gluten free, garlic and rosemary bread sticks. Substituting almond flour for 2/3 of the flour makes them low(er) carb. Using some potato starch and tapioca starch makes them crusty on the outside, yet soft and chewy on the inside. (Since potato starch and tapioca starch are derived from root vegetables – tapioca comes from the cassava root – it’s technically grain free, if you’re looking for a Paleoish bread that actually tastes like bread.)  Adding Parmesan cheese to the dough makes the flavor amazing!  And did I mention that the smell is so divine that I want to go lick the leftovers so I don’t have to share them with my family? Excuse me…

GF Rosemary Bread Sticks

I’ve also used this recipe to make pizza crust that is crispy on the bottom, yet pliable, so it supports toppings without being floppy or crumbing to pieces. If you value self care, you will choose the optional step of brushing garlic butter on the edges of the crust at the end. My kids have decided that this is now their favorite pizza crust, and it’s probably because of the garlic butter.

Low-carb Pizza Crust

The only downside of the pizza crust is that it’s best enjoyed fresh from the oven – which means I just gave you an excuse to eat the whole thing. You’re welcome. When I tried to reheat some leftover pizza that had been refrigerated, the crust had absorbed the sauce and turned soggy. Perhaps leftovers could be frozen and reheated in the oven instead of the microwave for better success. Or you could go with the preferred method of eating the whole thing. Your call.  The bread sticks reheat well on subsequent days. The bottom crust becomes soft instead of crusty, but still tastes awesome – especially when dipped in olive oil.

(Pssst, if you’re interested in a weight loss plan that includes this pizza once a week, check out my “Weight Loss for 1 in a Family of 4” easy weekly menu plans. Yes, I lost about 20 lbs. while still enjoying pizza!)

Mmmm... low-carb pizza with garlic butter crust!

Mmmm… low-carb pizza with garlic butter crust!

Low Carb, GF Bread Sticks/Pizza Crust

Dry Ingredients:
1 c. almond flour
1/4 c. tapioca flour/starch (they’re the same)
1/4 c. potato starch (NOT potato flour)
2 T. Parmesan cheese (I used the kind from a can)
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. baking powder
(For bread sticks, also add 1/8 tsp. garlic powder)

Wet Ingredients:
1/4 c. + 1 T. hot water (hot enough to dissolve the honey)
2 T. olive oil + more for topping dough
1 tsp. honey
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
1 egg

Bread Stick Toppings:
Olive oil
1 tsp. dried rosemary, crushed between fingers
Fresh ground pepper
Parmesan cheese
1 T. melted butter

Pizza Crust Directions:
Cut a piece of parchment paper to fit the size of your baking stone/pan.  This makes a 13″ – 14″ pizza, so make the circle at least 15″.  Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  If using a baking stone (recommended), place it in the oven while it preheats. (If you don’t preheat your pan, the crust may not crisp as well.)

Mix together the dry ingredients.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the wet ingredients.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together.  You should have a wet, sticky dough. Don’t worry if it seems more like batter than dough.

Place dough on the parchment paper and, using a greased spoon or silicone spatula, spread it out using circular motions, greasing the spoon as needed.  (I just spray my spatula with nonstick cooking spray when it starts to stick to the dough.) Spread it as thin as you can, with a raised ridge at the edge.  If desired, brush with a little additional olive oil.  (I skipped this step, but plan to do it next time.)

Slide a rimless cookie sheet under the parchment paper to help transfer the crust to the hot baking stone/pan.  Bake 8 minutes, then add toppings.  (I used Prego pizza sauce, Hormel Nitrate-Free Pepperoni, Falls Brand All Natural Hot Italian Sausage, mozzarella, white cheddar, and shredded Parmesan.) Bake 8 minutes more until cheese is bubbly and starts to brown.

For The Most Awesome Crust EVER: Melt 1 T. butter with a dash or two of garlic powder and brush on the edge of the finished pizza.  Pizza AND garlic bread sticks! Sooooooo good.

Bread Stick Recipe:
Follow the above recipe, adding garlic powder to the dry ingredients. After spreading the dough/batter into a 10-in. circle, use a spoon or spatula to press a few indentations into the dough. Drizzle with olive oil, letting it pool in the indentations. Crush rosemary between your fingers and sprinkle over the dough. I used a coarse-grind pepper grinder to lightly top the dough with pepper, then sprinkled a light coating of Parmesan cheese on top.

Bake 10 minutes at 425 degrees. Melt 1 T. butter and drizzle over the top. Use a pizza cutter to cut into strips or wedges and serve immediately. Store any leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week, and serve warm with olive oil for dipping.

Keepin’ It Real…
Not all of my experiments turn out so well.  Here’s my first attempt at making grain free chocolate chip cookies.  The taste is spot on, so I will definitely be trying again, but they’re a bit…thin.

Grain Free Cookie Attempt

Grain free chocolate chip cookie…pieces.

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The holidays are often the toughest time of year for those with gluten intolerance, especially if you have multiple food sensitivities in your home.  The one menu item that’s, perhaps, the most stressful to replicate is a gluten free, dairy free roll.  Personally, I hate baking yeast breads because they’re so time-consuming, and they end up grainy or crumbly when made ahead.  So I modified my popover recipe for those times when I want a roll without all the fuss.

GF, DF Popover Rolls

Mmmm…no fuss bread.

If you’re not familiar with popovers, they traditionally have a big hole inside the crusty exterior, and the roll is very moist and spongy.  Gluten free popovers do not “pop,” so I added some baking powder to give mine a little rise.  The result is that instead of a big hole in the center, these have several holes throughout, which give it a more roll-like appearance.  But once you taste them, you won’t care if it’s a true roll or not because they have a wonderful flavor!

The key to a tasty, gluten free roll is a little cornmeal.  You won’t taste the corn, but it helps the flavor and texture to resemble wheat rolls.  If you can’t tolerate corn, just substitute an equivalent amount of your GF flour blend.  Likewise, I used almond milk because I like its texture for baking, but you could use rice milk if you can’t tolerate almonds (although you might want to increase the fat by 1 T. and decrease the milk by 1 T., since rice milk is pretty watery).  For this recipe, I used the Namaste flour blend because my Costco is carrying it for a reasonable price, but I imagine you could substitute the flour blend of your choice.

These rolls come together in a snap – just the time it takes to preheat the oven – and are very tasty with honey butter, jam, or our new favorite spread, Trader Joe’s Pumpkin Butter.  They can be made ahead of time, since these will never get crumbly, and they will last for several days in the fridge.  If you have leftover rolls, try slicing them horizontally (with a sharp, serrated knife to keep from mashing the insides) and filling them with leftover turkey or your favorite sandwich fillings.  My family enjoyed them for breakfast, filled with scrambled eggs, sausage, and melted white cheddar (which you can omit, if cheese is not tolerated).

For more gluten free holiday recipes, check out my Green Bean Casserole and Pumpkin Pie Crunch.  For a special holiday breakfast, try my Orange Cranberry Scones and Bacon-Wrapped Smokies.  Happy holiday baking!

Gluten Free, Diary Free, Popover Rolls

1 1/2 c. minus 1 T. Namaste GF flour blend*
1 T. cornmeal (put this in the bottom of your 1/2 c. and fill with above flour for easy measuring)
3/4 tsp. salt (reduce to 1/2 tsp. if using salted butter or margarine instead of coconut oil)
3/4 tsp. baking powder
1 c. + 6 T. original almond milk (NOT vanilla sweetened)
3 eggs
2 T. refined coconut oil, melted (or substitute DF margarine with salt note above)

*If using a different flour blend that doesn’t already contain xanthan gum or guar gum, add 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum to the dry ingredients.

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  (You’ll turn it down to 400 when you put the batter in, but you want the oven really hot.)

In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together the flour, cornmeal, salt and baking powder.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk.  Whisk the wet and dry ingredients together until the batter is smooth.  Stir in the melted coconut oil or butter.

Pour batter into 12 greased muffin cups.  Turn the oven down to 400 degrees, then bake for 30-40 minutes.  (I baked mine for 33 minutes, but they could have gone a little longer to brown more.)  Serve warm from the oven or reheat in the microwave.

Just so you know…
As I promised in my pledge to blog the truth, here is – literally – the rest of the picture that you didn’t see in my photo above.  I had to shove my daughter’s spelling book out of the picture, brush crumbs off the table, and straighten the tablecloth for the kajillionth time before snapping my photo because my family is physically incapable of sitting at the table without pulling the tablecloth askew.  Please also notice the Legos on the stairs in the background because there are ALWAYS Legos everywhere.  Always.  And it’s laundry day, so as I type this, my laundry basket (also in the background of the picture) is waiting to hold the clean – but now incredibly wrinkled – clothes from the dryer.  Be blessed.

 The Rest of the Picture

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These Paleo-friendly muffins are moist and soft with a mild pumpkin flavor, and taste even better the second day (which, I’ve noticed, is common among baked goods made with coconut or almond flour).  For a stronger pumpkin flavor, substitute another 1/2 c. pumpkin for the banana (although this may affect the sweetness). You can vary the flavors by substituting a different fruit puree for the pumpkin, like applesauce or one of the many unsweetened flavored applesauce squeeze pouches available now, and swapping in frozen blueberries for the cranberries.

Oct 2014 019

These look and taste yummy, but scroll to the bottom to see my latest cooking flop. Seriously, it’s an epic fail.

This time of year, when fresh cranberries are available, I love the tart burst of flavor they add to muffins.  (Helpful Tip: Stock up on cranberries in November when they usually go on sale for $1, then put them inside a gallon-size freezer bag and throw them in the freezer for later use.)  These would make a great holiday breakfast because they’re low in sugar and loaded with protein and fiber, so you’ll at least start the day with a stable blood sugar level – even if you plan to indulge later!

Also, if you want to save money by roasting your own pumpkin, hang on to any leftover uncarved pumpkins you may have bought to decorate your doorstep.  Don’t listen to the fancy-pants food blogs that insist you can only bake with a special “pie” pumpkin (which is code for “expensive” pumpkin).  Lean in, because I have a secret to tell you:

Pumpkins are food.  Food can be eaten.

My grandmother made pies out of our leftover uncarved pumpkins for years because people who lived through the Depression survived by not throwing away food.  I know, shocking.  Some jack-o-lantern pumpkins may be a little more watery, but you can strain out the water with a coffee filter or just adjust the liquid content in your recipes, if needed, although I’ve never had a problem with mine.  I’ve followed these pumpkin roasting directions and simply cut my big pumpkin into chunks that will fit on my baking sheet.  (You may need to do it in batches or extend the roasting time if using big chunks.)

The best part about roasting and pureeing your own pumpkin is that you can freeze it in portion sizes that fit your favorite recipes.  I like to put 1/2 c. portions in quart-size freezer bags, press it into the bottom half of the bag, then press out the air and stack them in a loaf pan to freeze.  To thaw, simply pop one in the microwave for 30 sec. on 50% power, then flip over and repeat.

Now you’re ready to make these delicious, grain-free muffins all winter long!

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cranberry Muffins

1 very ripe banana (the more ripe, the better – just cut out any bad spots)
1/2 c. pumpkin puree (canned is fine, just make sure it’s plain pumpkin)
5 eggs
1/3 c. melted butter or coconut oil (I prefer butter, but have used both)
1/3 c. honey
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 c. coconut flour
1/2 c. almond flour
1 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice*
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3/4 c. cranberries, preferably chopped (frozen works)

*If substituting applesauce or a different fruit puree for the pumpkin – I’ve enjoyed using peach puree – omit the pumpkin pie spice, increase the cinnamon to 1 tsp., and use blueberries or whatever fruit you like instead of the cranberries.

Directions:
Mash the banana or break into chunks and mash in your mixing bowl with the paddle attachment.  (Just be sure to place your hands strategically over the bowl to prevent chunks from flying out of the bowl when it first starts.  Ask me how I know this…)  Mix in pumpkin puree.  Add eggs, one at a time, mixing after each one.  Mix in melted butter or coconut oil, honey, and vanilla.  Add remaining ingredients, except cranberries, and mix well.  Stir in cranberries.

Divide batter evenly among 12 greased muffin cups.  Smooth the batter on top, if you can, to avoid crunchy ridges on top of the muffins.  Bake at 375 degrees for 20-25 minutes until golden and the top springs back when you press down on one.  Again, these taste better the next day (and the next day, and the next day), so bake them the night before to make your morning go smoothly.

The Good, the Bad, and the “What is THAT?!!”
As now, as promised, here’s the flip side to my baking success.  I am most definitely NOT one of those artsy-craftsy bakers who makes Pinterest-worthy decorative cakes and cookies.  My idea of decorating a cake is topping it with the sprinkles that come with the can of Pillsbury Fudge Frosting (and God bless the folks at Pillsbury for making the BEST gluten free, dairy free chocolate frosting).  So when my son wanted to turn peanut butter balls into cute little owls, we came up with this:

Nailed it.

As my son put it, “I saw that turning out differently in my head.”  The good news is that when you’re baking with an almost-13-year-old, having your cute little owl morph into a spawn of the underworld is still a win.

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I came up with this recipe after scoring a reduced-price Udi’s gluten free raisin bread loaf from the day-old bakery cart at the grocery store.  This is a great way to use up GF bread that is past its prime, since it’s too expensive to waste!  However, we were low on milk, so I searched the internet for recipes that use evaporated milk and found an easy one on the Carnation site that I modified by adding extra butter and substituting some rum extract, one of my husband’s favorite flavorings.  I used 9 slices of bread for a “cakey” bread pudding, so if you prefer a more traditional pudding texture, use 8 slices.

Substitutions
The original recipe called for bread and raisins, not raisin bread, so if you don’t have raisin bread you can substitute 8 slices of GF bread and 1/2 c. raisins.  I used a little less sugar than the original recipe called for, since the bread was already sweetened, so add another tablespoon of brown sugar if using plain bread.  If you’re not a fan of rum flavoring, or don’t have it on hand, just substitute additional vanilla extract for the rum extract.  To make this dairy free, substitute 1 1/2 c. original almond milk for the evaporated milk, since I have found that they both have the same creamy texture and have successfully substituted that in the past.

Raisin Bread Pudding

Gluten Free, Buttery Rum Raisin Bread Pudding

8 or 9 slices gluten free raisin bread, cut into 1/2 in. cubes
2 eggs, beaten
1 12-oz. can evaporated milk (NOT fat free) or 1 1/2 c. almond milk
1/3 c. brown sugar
5 T. butter or DF margarine, divided (if subbing unsalted oil, like coconut oil, add 1/8 tsp. salt)
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. rum extract

Cube bread and set aside.  In a large mixing bowl combine beaten eggs, brown sugar, and 1/2 of the evaporated milk.  Melt 3 T. butter and add to mixing bowl with remaining ingredients and milk.  Stir until combined.  Add bread cubes and stir until coated.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  While oven is heating, set a timer for 5 min. and grease an 8″ x 8″ pan.  When the timer goes off, stir bread and transfer to prepared pan, pressing down on the mixture with a spatula.  Set timer for 5 min. again.  Cut remaining 2 T. butter into 8 cubes and place on top of bread mixture.

Butter-topped Bread Pudding

When the timer goes off, place pan in the oven and bake for 35-40 min. or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  (Mine took 35 min.)  Serve warm with whipped cream or, for a sweeter bread pudding, drizzle with caramel or butterscotch sauce.  For a dairy free topping, I’d suggest a powdered sugar glaze with almond milk and vanilla.

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Making gluten free frozen meals doesn’t have to take extra time, just extra planning, and it can save you a bundle on expensive GF convenience food for those nights when you just don’t have time to cook.  The most economical way to freezer cook is to stock up on meat and ingredients for side dishes that freeze well when they’re on sale, and plan to cook enough for 2 or 3 freezer meals in addition to your dinner that week.  If you do this only twice a week, you’ll have a treasure trove of quick meals for busy nights in no time!  I did this for three weeks last month, and was able to take the week before Thanksgiving off of cooking as a result.  It was awesome!  If you’re having company come to visit, then you’ll definitely be glad you took the time to make a few meals in advance so you don’t have to spend precious visiting time slaving in the kitchen.

Tips on Freezer Cooking
The key to successful freezer cooking is to get rid of as much air as you can in your bag or container.  I have a fancy vacuum-sealer that I never use because it’s cheaper to just use a Ziplock freezer bag (I use generic brands).  Just place your completely cooled food items into the smallest size bag that will work, press out the air, close the bag almost all the way and, if it’s not raw meat, use a straw to suck out the rest of the air.  You’ll see the bag shrink around your food.  Then just pull out the straw and quickly seal.  Your food will last for months this way with nary an ice crystal to cause freezer burn!  For casseroles or side dishes like mashed potatoes, I like to place them in a disposable tin pan (from the dollar store) with a layer of plastic wrap against the potatoes and heavy duty foil over that.

If you’re new to freezer cooking, avoid dishes with rice or pasta, as these can be tricky to freeze without them turning to mush – especially rice pasta, which gets mushy easily.  However, corn tortillas freeze well, as do potato side dishes.  Most GF breads freeze well, as do cupcakes and cookie dough.  (I prefer to freeze the dough, rather than cookies which can crumble after thawing, since freshly baked cookies are the best!)  Homemade meatballs and chicken strips freeze well and go with side dishes that are quick to heat, like pasta or frozen GF French fries (always read labels on fries, since some contain wheat).  When making a homemade sauce or cream soup for casseroles, be sure to add a pinch of xanthan gum to keep the ingredients from separating.  (This miracle ingredient is in just about every commercial sauce or convenience food, and it’s already in your pantry.  Use it!)  It’s best to freeze sauces or crunchy toppings (like the onions for my Green Bean Casserole) separately and assemble thawed ingredients just prior to baking.

Some of my favorite freezer meals are right on this blog:

Crock Pot Pork Taco meat can be frozen in serving sizes for tacos or nacho meat. You can also make the tacos ahead of time and freeze them in a bag.  These make great enchiladas, too, but freeze the sauce for enchiladas separately.  This is a very versatile meat that is on the menu regularly because it’s easy to throw together, makes a lot, and pork roasts often cost less than $2/lb.

  • If you don’t have enough green chilies, you can substitute chopped onion.  Or if you’re not a fan of pork, just freeze your favorite meat with GF taco seasoning!
  • If you’re new to cooking with corn tortillas, heat 3 or 4 at a time over low heat on a griddle sprayed with oil.  Flip after a few seconds, and immediately top with shredded cheese (we use cheddar or co-jack).  Put a 1-in. stripe of meat down the center.  When cheese is melted, lift one side of the tortilla over the meat, then roll the whole thing over to seal.  The heat makes them more pliable for rolling, and the cheese will keep the tortilla from popping open.

Lasagna – Okay, I know I said to not do pasta, but this is the exception since you don’t cook the noodles in advance.  Just layer the ingredients and freeze for later, or make a double batch so you can cook one and freeze one.

Mashed Potatoes – I tried the recipe from the Pioneer Woman blog for Thanksgiving and loved it!  I mashed a 5 lb. bag of potatoes the week before and had some for dinner, then froze the rest in a gallon-size freezer bag.  Then, on turkey day, I thawed it in the microwave and plopped it in a greased crock pot on high for a few hours, stirring occasionally to heat evenly.  At first, it was really soupy, but it thickened as it heated up – and tasted amazing!

  • For dairy free potatoes, skip the cream cheese and just use dairy free margarine and rice milk.
  • For a one dish meal, set aside some mashed potatoes for Shepherd’s Pie, which can also be frozen.

Fried Chicken Strips – These are a great way to use tenderloins trimmed from chicken breasts, or you can slice chicken breasts into strips.  I’ve linked my Mandarin Chicken recipe, but these work with any dipping sauce.

  • To freeze, cool cooked chicken at room temperature on plates lined with paper towels, then transfer to a freezer safe baking tray to freeze for a few hours.  Once frozen, transfer to a freezer bag and press out (or suck out) the air.  Cook from frozen in a 400 degree oven for about 20 min.
  • Recently, I’ve been using/loving the Hodgson Mill GF Seasoned Coating Mix (dairy, soy and corn free, and available at our Wal-Mart).  I follow the directions on the back for Country Fried Beef (which you can also make and freeze), and skip the messy egg wash by just applying a liberal amount of coating mix and frying in oil until golden brown.  (I coat all the chicken once, then do it a second time.)  The recipe on the box for Country White Gravy is easy and awesome, so make sure you freeze some potatoes to go with your chicken strips!  However, these also taste great with barbecue sauce or honey mustard.

Meatballs or Mini Meatloaves – You can grind oats in a food processor as a healthy substitute for bread crumbs in your favorite meatball recipe, or grind the heals from GF bread (I save mine in the freezer for making bread crumbs) and combine with your favorite seasonings.  Recently, I’ve begun adding shredded potato and grated onion to my meatballs for moist meatballs that somewhat resemble my Grandma’s Swedish meatballs (only I’m too lazy to roll them in flour and fry them, like we do with Swedish meatballs).

  •  I like to heat up frozen meatballs in spaghetti sauce while the pasta boils, but we sometimes eat them like mini meatloaves or as meatball subs in toasted Udi’s hot dog buns with some spaghetti sauce and melted mozzarella or provolone.

Ham and Cheese Sandwiches on Onion Poppy Seed Cheese Rolls/Buns – My mother-in-law made these for get-togethers with family and friends because you can make these in advance and pop the wrapped sandwiches in the oven for a quick meal.  I like to make cheese rolls from a Pamela’s bread mix for these, but you could use your favorite hamburger bun/hot dog bun/roll for these.

Also, don’t forget to freeze leftover turkey or roast chicken to make Turkey or Chicken Pot Pie Pizza or Biscuit Pot Pies!

Some of our favorite gluten free breads and desserts to freeze include:

With some quick meal items in the freezer this month, you’ll have time to bake yummy goodies like Sour Cream Sugar Cookies or these Easy Holiday Goodies to Make with Kids.  Throw some Wassail in the crock pot, and you’re set for the holidays!

 

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After nearly 5 years of disappointing attempts to make soft, delicious, gluten free rolls, I finally found a keeper!  The softness comes from sour cream, and for the flour I just tweaked my cookie flour blend by substituting 1 T. cornmeal for 1 1/2 T. of the flour blend.  I’ve discovered that adding a tiny bit of cornmeal to yeast breads gives your taste buds something to latch onto without tasting “corny.”

I almost discarded the recipe when my first attempt yielded tasty, but tiny, little dough nuggets, until I fished the yeast packet out of the trash and discovered that my yeast had expired.  With good yeast, these rolls still aren’t huge – about the size of a biscuit – but they taste heavenly fresh out of the oven with a little honey butter.  This recipe only took me a half hour to assemble, plus one hour to rise and less than 20 minutes to bake.  The dough itself is easy to work with, and would probably work well for cinnamon rolls.  (When I get around to trying that, I’ll let you know!)

For other Thanksgiving recipe ideas, check out my GF Green Bean Casserole and Pumpkin Pie Crunch.  And as long as you’re assembling my all-purpose GF flour blend (at the bottom of this post, with tips on how to use it for everything), make a large batch to have on hand for baking holiday goodies like my grandma’s Sour Cream Sugar Cookies or our favorite “I Can’t Believe These Are Gluten Free!” Chocolate Chip Cookies.  Happy Gluten Free Holidays!

Gluten Free Rolls

Gluten Free Sour Cream Rolls

Step 1 in Large Bowl of Mixer:
1 c. Brenda’s all-purpose flour blend* (see recipe below)
2 T. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 package rapid rise or instant yeast (check expiration date!)

Step 2 in Separate Small Bowl:
1/2 c. tapioca starch/flour (they’re the same thing)
1/2 c. potato starch (NOT flour)
1 1/2 T. additional all-purpose flour blend
1 T. cornmeal
1 T. sweet rice flour (also called “sticky rice” flour)
1 tsp. xanthan gum

Step 3 in Sauce Pan:
2 T. butter
1/4 c. water
3/4 c. sour cream (I used regular, NOT reduced fat)

Step 4:
1 egg

Preheat oven to 200 degrees and keep it on for about 5 min.  Turn off oven for at least 10 minutes, so you’ll have a warm place for your rolls to rise.

Combine step 1 flour blend, sugar, salt, and undissolved yeast in a large mixer bowl.  Set aside.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the step 2 ingredients.  Set aside.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt butter.  Add water, and stir in sour cream.  Turn off heat and continue stirring until sour cream is thoroughly incorporated.  If you have a thermometer, test to make sure the temperature of the liquid is between 120 – 130 degrees.  If it’s too hot, set it aside to cool for a minute.  (You don’t want to kill the yeast.)

Add the warm liquid mixture to the step 1 dry ingredients in the mixer bowl and beat 2 minutes at medium speed, scraping bowl occasionally.  Beat in egg.  Beat in step 2 flour mixture just until combined.  You should have a soft dough like cookie dough.

Grease or spray a muffin pan with nonstick spray.  (I use a silicone pan, so if you have dark, nonstick pans, you may need to lower the temperature or shorten the baking time.)  Spray a little oil on one hand and rub your hands together to keep the dough from sticking to your fingers.  Pull off about 1/4 c. of dough and roll into a ball.  Place 12 dough balls in the muffin cups.  (You’ll want to smooth the outside of the balls as much as possible, since gluten free rolls keep the shape of the dough when they rise.) Cover muffin pan with a dish towel and place in warm oven to rise for 45 min.

Remove rolls from oven, keeping covered, and heat oven to 375 degrees.  Bake rolls for 15 – 18 minutes, until golden brown.  Immediately brush warm rolls with butter or gently rub a stick of butter over the tops (my preferred method). Store rolls in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

For best results, serve fresh from the oven – or reheat, if making these ahead of time – with butter and honey.  To make honey butter, blend 2 parts softened butter and 1 part honey with a fork.

*Brenda’s All-Purpose GF Flour Blend:
3 c. white rice flour
3 c. brown rice flour
1 c. tapioca flour/starch
1 c. cornstarch
1 c. potato starch
3 T. sweet rice flour (also called sticky rice flour)
3 T. potato flour

Whisk together flours/starches in a large bowl and store in a gallon-size freezer bag in the fridge.  Always store anything containing brown rice flour in the fridge because it can go rancid.  I also store my sweet rice flour and potato flour in the freezer.  (If you can’t find these flours in the store, you can order them online through Vitacost.)

A note on substituting a GF flour blend for wheat flour in recipes: There are lots of “all-purpose” GF flour blends out there, but a good rule of thumb is that it should look like regular wheat flour when you measure it, which mine does.  (If it looks more like cornstarch, then it has a high starch content.)  This flour can be substituted cup for cup of wheat flour in most recipes.  However, you’ll want to add some additional starches for rolls or delicate cookie flour, like I did in the recipe and links above.  For cake flour, substitute 2 T. cornstarch for 2 T. of the flour blend.  For yeast breads like pizza dough, substitute 1 to 2 T. cornmeal or corn flour for some of the flour blend.  With my all-purpose blend you can substitute sorghum and/or millet for 1/4 c. of flour when making “whole grain” muffins/sweet breads, or add more starches for things like biscuits.  The point is, you don’t need a bunch of different flour blends.  I use mine as the base flour and lighten it with starches for delicate baked goods or mix it with high fiber flour in the same way you would add whole wheat to regular flour.  No need to have a different blend for every recipe!  

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