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Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

We needed to be in the car in two minutes, so I called up the stairs to my daughter and told her to come down. “I can’t. My hair is all tangled and I can’t get the tangles out!” she replied in tearful frustration. My daughter has gorgeous, thick, long hair (which is a mystery to me because if I put my hair in a ponytail, it could fit in one of her orthodontic rubber bands). We learned the hard way that if you don’t brush it thoroughly every single day, it will get tangled underneath. She’d been sick the week before, and had let go of her grooming routine while resting in bed, so the tangles didn’t come as a surprise to me. I rushed upstairs to see if I could help, but quickly realized that this problem would not be solved in two minutes. So I smoothed the top of her hair down over the tangles as best I could and took her to school.

Life can get tangled in all sorts of ways, can’t it? Like my daughter’s hair, tangles are often a result of procrastination that we try to brush over with pride, hoping no one will notice. We put off balancing the budget for a couple weeks, then suddenly realize that we’ve spent our whole grocery budget and it’s only half-way through the month. So we start pulling money from other funds to cover our tracks, and tell the kids there’s no money for clothes or activities, when the truth is that there was money set aside but we spent it on impulse buys at the grocery store. Pride keeps us from dealing with the tangle, so we keep repeating the behavior and the tangle grows.

Or perhaps it’s our health that’s all tangled to the point of crisis. Pride makes us put off going to the dentist or taking care of that issue that’s been nagging at us because we don’t want to be scolded by a doctor for our failures or told to do something unpleasant. I finally took our dog to the vet last week because his ears smelled so disgusting that we couldn’t stand to have him in the same room with us. I initially put off taking him to the vet for financial reasons; when you’re barely scraping by, you don’t have $265 to spend on a dog. But even after our financial situation improved, I still put off taking him to the vet because I knew they would point out all the ways in which we have failed to take good care of him (and there are many). So our poor dog got tangled up in my pride and has probably had infected ears for years.

The thing about tangles is that they rarely just affect us. Other people get caught in our tangles when we keep ignoring the effects of our procrastination and pride. My son was almost late to school because of the extra time we spent trying to deal with my daughter’s hair. If the police had been watching for speeders that day, I would have been issued a ticket as I raced my kids to school. Our tangles rarely affect us alone. Even if we think we’re the only ones aware of our hidden tangles, the fact that something is wrong underneath will eventually affect our actions and attitudes in other areas and spill over into our relationships. After school, when I asked my daughter how her day was, she said it had been as bad as her hair that morning. It was time to deal with the tangle.

When we got home from school, I got out her comb and some conditioner, then sat her down in front of the fireplace and started working through the tangles while she watched a favorite show. As I wrestled with those tangles, I discovered they were matted with grime that had been missed in the shower. The only way to get the tangles out was to wash them. So I drew a bubble bath for her while she put on her swimsuit (because 13-year-old girls are the most modest people on the planet).

I lit a candle on the edge of the tub, and watched her slowly relax in the warm water as I washed and gently combed her hair. We talked about how I used bathe her when she was little, and as the memories of childhood washed over her, her spirits began to lift. After she dried off, I gave her a snack to eat while I braided her hair so it wouldn’t be dripping wet when we went to an appointment. Her entire countenance changed after that, and for the rest of the day she was joyful and content.

God spoke so powerfully to me through that experience, allowing me to give my daughter the gift of untangling that my Heavenly Father offers me when I bring him my mess. Sometimes it’s my circumstances that are a mess of procrastination entangled with pride, but sometimes the tangles are in my mind. Yesterday, God invited me to sit by the fireplace while he combed through the tangled mess of my views regarding food and their relationship to my health. It had not only entangled me, but my family and finances, and had grown into a twisted mess of controlling behaviors and slavery to food. In frustration, I cried out to God to fix what I could not seem to fix on my own. He gently separated out each strand of lies I’d believed that had been tangled with the truth in my mind, and washed them out with my tears of repentance and his healing balm of truth from the Scriptures.

God then invited me to choose whatever food I wanted to eat – not what I felt like I should eat, but what I really wanted to eat. While I ate, he began the process of retraining my thinking, much in the same way I’d trained my daughter’s hair into a braid. He would pull at one section of my long-held beliefs until we got to the root of it, then guide me to the truth. We traced many of my tangles back to my mother’s breast cancer when I was 5 years old. The truth that food is correlated to health was deeply entangled with the lie that by eating the “right” foods I can control my health (and the health of my family), which was also tangled with fear of what will happen if I don’t.

I was entangled in the belief that I must eat whatever “experts” say is healthy and avoid what isn’t – which we all know changes from week to week – so that I would not get cancer like my mom. But as God pulled on those strands, he shaped my thinking to reflect the truth that it was because of her cancer that she cried out to God and asked him for a sign if she would live to see her girls graduate from high school. The sign she asked for was a phone call from someone who had never called before. That person called within minutes. This story became not only a building block in my mom’s faith, but part of the bedrock of my belief that God hears and answers prayer. Where would my faith be without my mom’s cancer testimony? Where would my children’s faith be without my firm faith in God? My mother survived the cancer she had when she was 37, and went on to live another 37 years. If God was gracious to her in her weakness, will he not also be gracious to me if I should have to walk down that road?

Just as the memory of my lifelong care for her lifted my daughter’s spirits, and her braid kept her hair from tangling, training my mind to remember God’s constant provision for me and his promise to never leave me is what will keep me in perfect peace and protect my mind from getting tangled again.

I don’t know what tangles have come to your mind as you’ve been reading my story, but I know who is equipped to gently comb through them. God does not shame us when we come to him with our tangled mess. He says, “Oh child, come to me and rest awhile. Let me help you comb through this and be free.” We may cry a few tears because sometimes the tangles are painful to remove. Sometimes there is sin that must be washed out by Jesus’ blood that was shed for our sins, and it might take a lot of combing to remove the lies that led to our mess, but God’s discipline always brings healing and restoration when we cooperate with him. There is no tangle he cannot untangle.

I have heard Israel saying, “You disciplined me severely, like a calf that needs training for the yoke. Turn me again to you and restore me, for you alone are the Lord my God. I turned away from God, but then I was sorry. I kicked myself for my stupidity! I was thoroughly ashamed of all I did in my younger days.”

“Is not Israel still my son, my darling child?” says the Lord. I often have to punish him, but I still love him. That’s why I long for him and surely will have mercy on him.” – Jeremiah 31:18-20

Just as surely as God has been disciplining his children and restoring them with love and mercy since the beginning of time, God will have compassion on all those who bring their tangles to him. Come home, child, and be set free.

No more tangles!

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I stared at the delicious berry cobbler, its sweet aroma enticing my empty, growling stomach. I had woken up early and decided to bake a breakfast treat for my family. They had enjoyed it before heading off to school, and now it was my turn to eat breakfast. I wanted to enjoy what I had made, but couldn’t bring myself to dish it up. The square pan of cobbler made 6 adult-sized servings. Three were gone, so that meant three servings were left. If I wanted to serve it to them again, there would be none for me. The same thing happens whenever I bake muffins. A dozen muffins equals two mornings of muffins for my husband and two kids, and so I go without.

Now I’m sure some of you are thinking That’s dumb. Why doesn’t she just eat what she wants and serve her family something else the next day? If so, you have probably never tried to shop and cook for a gluten free family of 4 on a tight budget. My family has been gluten free for nearly nine years, and during half of those years we were either unemployed or living paycheck to paycheck with a grocery budget that was no more (and sometimes less) than what I spent before we had kids, when we were not gluten free.

If you’re not familiar with the upcharge on gluten free products, here are a few examples: I bought a 5 lb. bag of regular wheat flour (to make pinata paste) for $1; the cheapest 5 lb. bag of gluten free flour that I can buy is almost $12. I used to buy loaves of wheat bread at the dollar store; a 2-pack of decent GF bread at Costco is $9. Bulk gluten free oats are triple the cost of regular oats. Gluten free crackers typically cost twice as much and contain fewer ounces (although they come in the same size box as their wheat-containing counterparts). If you order a GF pizza at a restaurant, they typically charge $12 for a small, one-topping pizza that feeds one man or two kids.

$20 for 5 items

My purpose in pointing this out is not to complain about our circumstances, but demonstrate how difficult it is for a family to be on the gluten free diet without it having a huge impact on your finances. When health magazines and blogs are touting the benefits of the gluten free diet, they often fail to mention the hidden costs. Yes, we cut costs wherever we can by using naturally gluten free carbs like corn tortillas, potatoes, and rice, but when you are on a restrictive diet for years – potentially a lifetime – you have to have variety and give kids some sense of normalcy. In order to do this I’ve cooked from scratch for years and limited our use of GF convenience products.

The Dark Side of Being Gluten Free
Due to the high cost of GF foods when money was especially tight, I developed a scarcity mindset about food. I would buy GF products when they were on sale, intending to bless my family, but because the portions were so small and expensive, I struggled to actually give the food to them. I carefully doled out portions, and often held onto the last portions of something so long that the food expired before being eaten because I didn’t want anything to run out. This struggle turned into a full-blown crisis when my son hit middle school, and I realized he was still eating the same portions I’d served when he was in second grade. Every rib was visible, and while he rarely complained of hunger, I knew he wasn’t eating enough. And yet, every time he sat down with a bag of snacks and started munching, it threw me into a panic. I would hand him a bag one minute, then snatch it away the next because we couldn’t afford for him to mindlessly much on our expensive food.

About the time my son was starting 7th grade, I was experiencing a health crisis from the stress of our finances on top of my mother’s cancer, surgery, and subsequent dementia. I went on a grain free diet, hoping to heal my gut and get over the sensitivity to corn that had developed from years of eating too much corn. (One of the side effects of cutting out a food, like wheat, is overconsumption of other foods, which can lead to a sensitivity to those foods.) Since I stopped eating grains during that time, I gave my servings to my son. During the two years I did this, I lost 20 lbs. and my son grew 6 inches. I came to realize that it was the only way I could sustain our tight grocery budget while providing enough food for him to grow.

As awful as it sounds, my solution to our grocery budget problem was to feed my son by starving myself. For the past three years, I have baked for my family without eating what I bake. This morning, as I stared at that cobbler, the Lord brought a verse from Deuteronomy to my mind that the Apostle Paul mentioned when talking about the right of the apostles to be paid for their work:

The law of Moses says, “You must not muzzle an ox to keep it from eating as it treads out the grain.” Was God thinking only about oxen when he said this? Wasn’t he actually speaking to us? Yes, it was written for us, so that the one who plows and the one who threshes the grain might both expect a share of the harvest. (1 Corinthians 9:9-10)

It is painful for me to admit, but for years I have muzzled myself while cooking for my family in order to make this expensive diet work, and that is not God’s way. My guess is that I am not alone. I know how moms are, and we will go without in order to provide for our kids. I’ve worn the same ratty clothes for years in order to make sure my kids have clothes. My husband and I gave up date nights for years so we could keep our kids in their activities. My guess is that you probably do this too. There’s nothing wrong with making sacrifices for our kids, unless it takes us into bondage to the belief that we don’t deserve to enjoy the same benefits as our kids.

Most of us can handle a short-term sacrifice or season of survival-mode, but when it becomes a way of life, it can change the wiring of our brains. What starts out as a voluntary choice becomes an involuntary response that is so ingrained we don’t recognize that it’s happening, and may not even remember where it started. At first, I was happy to give my son my grain portions in order to help him grow, but it is not healthy for me to stay captive to the mindset that what’s best for my family must come at my expense. The truth is that God is able to provide for ALL our needs – not just my family’s needs, but mine!

There is a financial and psychological toll to the gluten free diet, on top of the emotional toll of living differently than the world around you. That may not be what you want to hear if you’re new to this diet and hopeful that it will bring healing, but a wise person counts the cost of each decision. So these costs are something I would strongly urge anyone to consider before embarking on this as a way of life. Yes, it can help relieve intestinal issues. I do believe this diet has made a difference for my husband and son, which is why they are still on it. However, in my case, my intestinal issues were likely triggered by stress, and the stress created by the demands of the healing diet I went on only exacerbated my stress and made my symptoms worse!

God ultimately healed my intestines by helping me deal with the issues that were causing my gastrointestinal system to shut down in the first place. I discovered that during times of prolonged stress your digestive system stops working properly, so if you want to heal your gut, allow God to first heal your heart. However, as I’ve also discovered, there can be secondary issues that arise when we try to address our digestive issues with the gluten free diet, like the psychological and financial toll, which also need to be healed by God.

I don’t believe it’s wrong or bad to be on the gluten free diet. But I also don’t believe it comes without risks. Thankfully, God not only heals bodies, he heals minds. He has already helped me overcome my scarcity mindset, so I’m able to feed my two kids – who are now both teenagers – without freaking out over the cost like I used to. My way of coping with tight finances was to make everyone eat less, but God’s way was to help us pay off our second mortgage, which frees up more money for food. When God meets a need, it doesn’t come at our expense, but rather from his provision!

I believe God gave me the verse above to shine the light of truth on a place in my mind that was still darkened by years of financial struggle. When God sets us free from physical or financial bondage, he also needs to set us free from the psychological bondage that accompanies it in order for us to be totally free. If you are in a similar place, I am praying for you today, and asking God to shine his light on the dark places that hold us captive so he can set us free.

Now all glory to God, who is able, through his mighty power at work within us, to accomplish infinitely more than we might ask or think. (Ephesians 3:20)

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It was the end of a long, busy day at the end of a long, busy week. I was about to finally head to bed when I spotted blood streaks on the ottoman, then blood stains on the carpet. Our dog must have torn his claw on something and bled everywhere he stepped. In my state of exhaustion, I hastily grabbed the untested carpet cleaner and started working on the blood stains. The good news is that we got the blood out; the bad news is that our carpet now looks like this.

There are no words for this atrocity.

I was so irritated about the “clean” spots that have now ruined our uniformly dirty carpet that I barely slept that night. The real kicker is that when I found another blood stain later, I tried the Oxyclean that I’d forgotten was in our cupboard, and it worked perfectly to get the blood out without bleaching our carpet.

<insert your favorite Christian curse words here>

Why, Lord, why? Why couldn’t I have thought of that earlier, so I wouldn’t have these stupid bleach spots on my carpet! My husband claims that the spots represent the true color of our carpet, so if we just deep cleaned everything it would match again. I, on the other hand, feel like it would be a whole lot easier if we just muddied our shoes and used those spots like stepping stones to make them look like the rest of the carpet. I’m even willing to spill some coffee – cheap hotel coffee that’s been in my pantry for years, of course, not the good stuff – if that’s what it takes to avoid moving furniture to clean our carpet.

I wonder if you can relate. We don’t like spots that stand out and draw attention. It’s much easier to throw some mud on and try to look like everyone else rather than appear spotless and risk standing out. And yet, when Christ cleanses us by his blood shed for our sins, he removes our filthy rags of shame and clothes us with his righteousness. He sanctifies us, and whatever has been sanctified has been set apart as holy unto the Lord. But being set apart kinda makes us weird. We ought to celebrate our deliverance when God does a miracle in our lives, but sometimes we cover it with a rug or just keep silent because we don’t want to look different from those around us. Why do I have these spots on my carpet? To remind me that what Christ has done for me makes me different, and it’s time to stop worrying about blending in.

A few weeks ago, in front of a group in my church, I shared my testimony of God’s miraculous deliverance and provision for me over the past year. And I have never felt so weird. Church ought to be the place where we testify about God’s goodness, and yet sometimes it seems almost inconsiderate to say that God has been good to me when I’m surrounded by those who are suffering. However, when we’re suffering we need to hold on to hope that God is good and able to preserve us in the midst of suffering. How will we know that God still provides for his children and answers prayer if no one testifies that he does? I’ve blogged plenty about God’s faithfulness in my times of suffering. Now it’s time to share my testimony that God not only sustains, but delivers us to victory. So here’s my bleached-spot testimony because God deserves some glory for all his goodness to us.

Over the past year, God has delivered me from slavery to food after years of multiple food sensitivities and frustration with so-called “gut-healing” diets. After years of bowing down to food as my healer, God revealed himself to me as my healer. Even though my family still eats mostly gluten free by choice, we enjoy the freedom of knowing that God is able to bless any food to the nourishment of our bodies if he says he wants to because he’s the one who created it. In fact, he instructed me to go all out last Christmas with every kind of celebratory food my son loved while he was suffering from severe intestinal issues, just to prove to me that he is able to heal us in spite of an unhealthy diet. And he did. Because he’s God. Hear the Word of the Lord:

Is anyone thirsty? Come and drink – even if you have no money! Come, take your choice of wine or milk – it’s all free! Why spend your money on food that does not give you strength? Why pay for food that does you no good? Listen to me, and you will eat what is good. You will enjoy the finest food. Come to me with your ears wide open. Listen, and you will find life. – Isaiah 55:1-3

I find life in knowing that it is not bread – gluten free or wheat bread – that satisfies me, but the Bread of Heaven, Jesus Christ! God’s purpose in setting me free from slavery to food was part of his greater purpose of setting me free from slavery to fear – and I don’t mean little fears, like a fear of spiders. I’m talking heart-pounding, gut-wrenching, palm-sweating, panic-inducing, red-hot FEAR. My fear mostly had to do with people, so God started by dealing with my fear over my children. By the grace and power of God, I am now able to stand up to the enemy and pray mighty prayers of faith over my children because I know whose child I am and how big my Heavenly Father is. No matter how huge the obstacle is that’s facing my child, God’s answer is:

But the Lord says, “The captives of warriors will be released, and the plunder of tyrants will be retrieved. For I will fight those who fight you, and I will save your children.” – Isaiah 49:25

While I await the deliverance of the Lord in some areas regarding my children, my victory is that instead of speaking in agreement with the fears I used to have, I am able to speak words of faith, hope and courage. I am wired to react in controlling ways when I feel fear, so being set free from fear means freedom to respond in accordance with God’s will in situations pertaining to my children, instead of reacting negatively out of fear. One of the fruits of the Holy Spirit is self-control, and the victory God desires for me as a parent is to be directed by the Holy Spirit when I speak or react to my children. God has been in the process of rewiring my brain and changing my gut-reactions to my children so that I can now respond from a position of faith instead of fear. He has removed the chains of bondage to fear of failing as a mother, and given me this promise:

I will teach all your children, and they will enjoy great peace. – Isaiah 54:13

God has also delivered me from loneliness and slavery to the approval of people.  The day it sank in that I consider Jesus to be my dearest friend, he reached in and pulled out the root of loneliness that had been planted when I experienced rejection as a child. I realized that Jesus had filled my need for acceptance and love with his daily presence as he spoke to me through his Word, and the satisfaction of knowing there’s no need God can’t fill so permeated my heart that I was able to release others from filling my needs. Instead of caring about what people think of me, I am now free to just care about people. This is the purpose of God’s deliverance, the restoration of our relationship to him and others.

Delivering me from loneliness was not just God’s gift to me but to my husband, as well. He recently started his doctorate, which requires him to be in class or doing homework in the evenings. I am able to release him to pursue his dreams without worrying about feeling neglected because I’m no longer looking to my husband to fill what God is able to fill. I am free to love and enjoy whatever my husband is able to give without feeling desperate for attention because I know that God is able to bless me beyond anything I could ask or imagine from my husband.

For your Creator will be your husband; the Lord of Heaven’s Armies is his name! He is your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel, the God of all the earth. – Isaiah 54:5

As God set me free and began to restore relationships, he gave me the gift of rest this past winter. My oldest, whom I’d homeschooled for 6 1/2 years, went back to public school. My daughter remained at home, but directed her own learning. I was free to study God’s Word, worship, and rest. I experienced a desire for intercessory prayer like I’d never experienced before. Days would slip by as I soaked in God’s presence, and I felt like that was exactly what God ordained for me in that season. I sensed his delight in my delight for him! Out of this season of rest came a promise from God that he wanted to help us get out of debt by helping us pay off our second mortgage. I didn’t know how or when, but I knew God was going to help us because the day I asked him to confirm that promise in his Word, my daily reading happened to be in Jeremiah 29. The Holy Spirit stopped me on this verse, and spoke it over me as my promise:

I will end your captivity and restore your fortunes. – Jeremiah 29:14

Seven years ago, we were unemployed and had to drain every penny from our savings and start over. During that time we learned to trust in God’s provision as he met our needs. Seven months after God gave us the promise that he would restore us financially, we paid off our second mortgage with money that God provided from an unexpected source. We are not only free of debt (except for our first mortgage), we are free from bondage to the stronghold of scarcity.

I know some of you are starting to think I’m preaching a “prosperity gospel” that says if we become a Christian, we’ll get rich and everything will fall into our laps. We are not free from debt in order to bless ourselves, but in order to bless others in need. God blesses his children so that we will share with those in need, causing them to give glory to God for his provision (2 Cor. 9:10-11). The greatest delight in being set free from debt has been the renewed ability to give to others. Jesus, the Good Shepherd, says this regarding his “sheep” who listen to him and follow him:

The thief’s purpose is to steal and kill and destroy. My purpose is to give them a rich and satisfying life. – John 10:10

Rich and satisfying does not mean comfortable and easy. A rich and satisfying life comes from confidence that God is who he says he is and can do for us whatever he desires to do. The Word of God is full of stories of God’s power and ability to deliver. It is full of promises that God desires to provide for his children and bless them. Too often, we pray wishy washy prayers that lack faith in God’s ability to do what he flat out says in his Word that he desires to do for us. This isn’t about God providing for our comfort; I’m talking about God giving us victory! In some areas of my life, I have experienced deliverance – from intestinal issues, debt, fear of people – and in others, I’m experiencing the victory of joy in the midst of waiting to see deliverance.

God is not a Santa Clause to whom we pray for the stuff we would like to fill the “stocking” of our selfish desires for a comfortable, easy life. But if there’s a promise in God’s Word that God has pointed out to me and said, “This one is yours,” then I will pray for it with every ounce of faith God gives me, believing that it is mine – even before I see it. That’s how we get victory; we believe God to be God. We take our needs to him first, believing that he is able to provide. The thief wants to kill our joy, rob us of victory, and destroy our faith by keeping us focused on our areas of weakness, our failures, our needs. But the thief can only take from us what we willingly surrender. If you are a child of God, stand your ground and say out loud – as many times as you have to in order to believe it:

God is good.
He is my provider.
He is my shield.
He is my strength.
He is my deliverer.

Yes, this world is broken. We all have areas in our lives that are broken, but it’s time to stop wearing our brokenness like a badge of honor. If we believe that God heals, then let’s take our brokenness to him and pray a God-sized prayer of belief that “by his wounds we are healed” (Isiah 53:5). If you struggle with belief, God accepts you right where you are, just as Jesus accepted the man who acknowledged, “I do believe; help me overcome my unbelief” (Mark 9:24). God has not stopped doing miracles. He still heals, restores, delivers. But like my bleached carpet spots, we sometimes don’t want to trumpet our healing, lest we make others feel bad about their brokenness. Well, here’s the truth: I am broken, just like you. But I am healed, and that’s the label I will wear to the glory of God.

What has God done for you this past year? How has he delivered or miraculously provided for you? I invite you to leave a comment and give him praise. Let’s stand out as bleached spots together, giving God all the glory for his goodness and provision!

 

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It was the middle of October, and my son’s intestinal issues had gone from bad to worse. Past doctors visits had yielded no helpful information, and my attempt to put him on a gut-healing diet earlier in the year had caused my extremely underweight teenager to start losing weight. So I sought council from a nutritional expert friend of mine on inflammation, in the hope that it would give me some direction on how to help my son. She told me what I already knew from countless hours of research: that toxins and certain foods cause inflammation, and inflammation is the root of almost all our diseases. I had read all about inflammation, but the more I researched, the longer the list of dangerous foods to avoid became, leaving me feeling even more overwhelmed and discouraged.

But then she said something surprising. She said that if we are believers in Christ, the Holy Spirit dwells in every cell of our bodies, and only he knows what is wrong and how to fix it. We need the discernment of the Holy Spirit in all areas of our life, including our health. When we face physical difficulties, we need to seek God’s direction first (before Web MD) because God is our healer, whether he chooses to heal us through medicine, diet, or some other means.

This should not have come as a shock to me, since I have often experienced the leading of the Holy Spirit in other areas of my life, but I had been blinded to the fact that I had been turning to diet and the internet for healing instead of God. As the day wore on, I felt the familiar tug of the Holy Spirit on my heart, and God challenged me to believe that he wanted to heal me of my own intestinal issues. For three years I had struggled with bloating and cramping, and had identified corn, beans, yeast, onions, soy, and wheat as problems for me. Last spring, I attempted an incredibly strict “gut healing” diet to rid me of these issues – the same one that was a disaster for my son – but it only led to a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth that increased the number of foods I had to limit! I had done all the research, followed the wisdom of the “experts,” and only found myself pulled further into bondage to food.

That day, following my conversation with my friend, I realized that I had embraced the knowledge that God can set me free from bondage to fear, but it had never occurred to me that my physical bondage to food sensitivities and fear of food were areas of my life that needed to come under the authority of Christ. God said to me, “I want to heal you and set you free from your captivity to food so that you will know that I alone am God and have the power to heal. Food is not to be feared for I am the Creator of all things, and if I say it’s good, it’s good. Food is neither your healer; I am.”

Later, God confirmed this direction with 1 Timothy 4:3-5, in which the Apostle Paul is instructing Timothy to have nothing to do with teachings that call for abstaining “from certain foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth.”

For everything God created is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving, because it is consecrated by the word of God and prayer.

Essentially, God challenged me to stop believing that it is what I eat – or don’t eat – that gives me health. It is the manner in which I eat that matters. Am I choosing or excluding foods based on fear because of something I read, or am I accepting everything God has provided for me with an attitude of thanksgiving, believing that if I have prayed and asked God to bless it, he will make it safe for me? Who is my God, the Creator or his creation? I had embraced the philosophy that “food has power” because it seemed right in my eyes, but I then became a slave to fear and a whole host of rules because when we ascribe power to anything other than God, we end up bowing down to it and becoming its slave. I’m not saying we should all throw out sound nutritional advice or ignore food allergies, but rather that we need the Holy Spirit’s discernment in order to know which of the many competing – and often contradictory – voices we hear in medicine and on the internet are right for us! I can’t tell you what’s right for you, but God can.

So I told God that I believe that he is my healer, and that night I ate pulled pork on a wheat bun, salad with soy sauce and onions, and delicious chocolate cake! In the months that followed, each time I ate something that used to hurt me or that was on the “bad foods” list, I gave thanks to God for his healing, and asked him to bless it to my body. At first, I continued to experience some bloating, but each time I did, I said – often aloud – “Thank you Lord for healing me and blessing this food to my body.” And the symptoms would disappear. Last month my family went out for Mexican food for the first time in 3 years because, praise God, I am fully healed!

However, knowing that God is my healer, I still struggled over what to do for my son. By the last week before Christmas break he was discouraged by his physical discomfort and desperate for help. Having not heard a word from the Lord after months of prayer, I reluctantly turned back to the gut-healing diet, hoping that would help. But who wants to give up treats at Christmastime? Clearly, if I followed the wisdom I “knew,” which was to stop feeding him processed food so his intestines would heal, it would further discourage his spirit at a time when we should be celebrating. After 1 week of misery on the diet that resulted in symptoms that only grew worse, God finally spoke.

Celebrate. That was God’s direction for me, and his word over my son’s healing. God revealed that he was going to heal my son not through abstinence from certain foods, but through feasting on them! My instructions from the Lord were to do and cook whatever would bless my family and create an atmosphere of celebration. For my family, that means certain recipes that are a part of our holiday traditions. My son would not accept bacon-wrapped dates; it had to be bacon-wrapped Little Smokies! Just as God commanded the Isrealites to observe days of feasting, rest, and celebration of God’s goodness, God said to me, “Celebrate, rest, and watch for my deliverance.”

Sometimes God heals us through obedience to natural laws and following logical medical advice. I absolutely believe that. But sometimes God chooses to heal us in spite of those laws because he wants to open our eyes to the mighty power of God and will not share his glory with anything else. He wants there to be no question in our minds that our deliverance came from him! Friends, I never felt like I was supposed to pray for healing for myself because I just assumed it was God’s will for me to suffer. God allowed me to go through a season of suffering, about which I wrote in this post from last spring, because I kept turning to food and the wisdom of others to save me. In this season of my life, God is teaching me that I must trust him with every aspect of my life and the lives of my children, and seek HIS wisdom first, no matter how crazy it sounds.

So that morning, through tears of surrender, I made cinnamon rolls. I stopped worrying about whether or not what we ate was healthy – although we eat very healthy anyway – and focused on giving thanks to God. We began the habit of reading passages of scripture after dinner, then sharing something for which we’re thankful – a habit we’ve kept up since the holidays and hope will become a permanent routine. After we’ve shared, we each enjoy a piece of really good chocolate. Because God is good. He is worthy to be praised and makes all things for our enjoyment.

In the 4 weeks since our “celebration regiment” began, we’ve noticed a huge change in my son’s intestinal issues. His terrible symptoms are gone, he is healing, and we give God ALL THE GLORY! When we face our most difficult challenges and say, “No matter what, God is good and I will delight in his provision for me,” we don’t just get victory over the enemy and fear. We triumph and get the spoils!

You might think that this is a “how to” post on healing, or assume I’m implying that God wants to heal everyone supernaturally (which I’m NOT), and perhaps the reason why I have not felt God’s permission to blog throughout all this is that I might have been tempted to end this post right here. However, I hope that as you’ve been reading, the question that’s come to your mind is, “How could she know that God wanted to heal them that way?” Because while healing is part of my story and now my son’s, God’s purpose in healing was to teach me this message I share with you today: We need discernment from the Holy Spirit in ALL areas of our life – physical, spiritual, emotional, relational, mental, habitual – and it will only come through a relationship with Jesus Christ. He is our healer and deliverer, and only he knows from what we need to be set free. If we look to any wisdom of this world to save us, it will only take us captive. No book or blog – including this one – will show you and me the path to a victorious life. We must be led along it daily by the gentle hand of Jesus. Freedom from fear is the victory; healing is just one of the spoils. 

So how do we develop spiritual discernment? How do we know if and when God wants to heal us or set us free from some sort of bondage? First, we do not seek a healing; we seek the Healer. A relationship with Jesus Christ is the beginning and end of our spiritual journey. If you have not asked Jesus into your heart by believing that he is the Son of God who died for your sins, was raised from the dead in order to conquer sin and death for all who would believe in him, and sits at the right hand of God interceding on behalf of those who love him, then that is the first step. When you have invited Jesus to be Lord of your life, then he gives you the gift of the Holy Spirit, who enables you to have the mind of Christ in your circumstances. (If you would like to do this today, please leave a comment so I can pray with you, although you don’t need me to pray in order to receive Christ into your heart. You need only to confess your sins to him and ask him to be Lord of your life.)

How do you know if you have the mind of Christ as you’re considering the choices before you? To properly discern the Holy Spirit’s voice from your own or other influences, you must:

  • Learn to distinguish God’s voice by reading the Bible, God’s revelation of his love for humanity and desire for relationship with us. God will not direct you in ways that are contrary to his Word. That’s why each time I’ve prayed for direction, I’ve specifically asked God to back it up in the Bible before I act on it. The beautiful thing about reading the Bible daily is that God almost always has the confirmation of his word to me right there in that day’s selection. I didn’t seek it out; he had it waiting for me on his appointed day. Don’t let the enemy discourage you if you struggle with doing this on a daily basis at first. We don’t read the Bible to impress God with our devotion; we read it to connect with him. When you miss a day, don’t stress about it. Ask God to give you a desire for his Word, and pick it up the next day!
  • Listen to Bible-teaching, Spirit-filled preachers and teachers, and belong to a community of believers. Pray for God to reveal himself to you through his Word and godly teachers. I receive direction from the Holy Spirit as God’s Spirit within me rises up with a resounding “YES!” every time I read the scriptures or hear a message from someone through whom God wants to speak to me. When all messages line up – even if it doesn’t make logical sense – obey.
  • Obedience is key to spiritual discernment. If you don’t obey when you know what God wants you to do, you will eventually cease to hear the voice of the Holy Spirit until some disaster strikes and you come seeking him. If you draw near to God, he promises to draw near to you (James 4:8). Obedience often begins with simply praying in agreement with whatever you’re reading in God’s Word. Pray, “Yes, Lord. Thank you for this truth I’m reading. Show me how to live it in my daily life.”
  • Finally, discernment is something for which we should earnestly pray and seek. Our lives on earth matter. There are eternal consequences to our actions. God healed my son and has been prospering him in public high school (after being homeschooled for the past 6 1/2 years) in order to pry my white-knuckled hands off of him, and show both of us that Jesus is his Savior – not me. He set me free from intestinal issues so that I would stop preaching that the gluten-free or grain-free diet saves, and instead speak the truth that Jesus saves. He alone is the Way, the Truth, and the Life!

Christ Jesus came to set us free from bondage. Sometimes that bondage is physical, and sometimes it’s spiritual. He loved us, while we were still sinners, and died to set us free. If the Son has set you free, then you are free indeed! Praise God and give him glory!

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This delicious, holiday breakfast cake is full of fiber, protein and pumpkiny goodness that won’t spike your blood sugar or cause you to gain weight. (We’ll leave that job to Grandma’s sugar cookies and fudge.) Nicely spiced with cinnamon and vanilla, there’s just enough sweetness (from only 1/2 c. honey!) to compliment the tartness of the cranberries. If you don’t care for fresh (or frozen) cranberries, you can substitute dried cranberries, although they are heavily sweetened with sugar.

Using a half coconut flour, half almond flour blend delivers a wonderful texture and moist crumb that lasts for over a week in the fridge, which makes this a great make-ahead recipe for your gluten free or dieting guests.  (Check with strict Paleo guests to make sure they’re okay with the xanthan gum and baking powder; everything else is Paleo. You can omit these ingredients, but it will affect the texture and rise.) If you’re not a fan of coconut, rest assured that there are so many other flavors going on in this recipe that you’ll get all the health benefits of coconut flour without tasting it!

Although this resembles a muffin more than a cake in terms of sweetness, baking it like a cake in a 9″x13″ pan makes the equivalent of 2-dozen muffins without all the scooping (and yes, I’m just that lazy). This is one of my daily breakfast choices that helps me maintain my weight loss, but if you’re looking for a holiday treat to please your sweet tooth, check out my gluten free caramel sticky buns and bacon-wrapped smokies. However, with the guilt-free breakfast below, you can have your (breakfast) cake and eat it too!

Pumpkin Cranberry Cake

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cranberry Breakfast Cake

1 very ripe medium banana
½ c. pumpkin puree
6 eggs
½ tsp. salt
¾ c. coconut flour
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. xanthan gum, slightly rounded
½ c. butter, melted
½ c. honey
2 tsp. vanilla extract
¾ c. almond flour (fine flour, not coarse almond meal)
1½ tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. baking soda
1½ c. fresh or frozen cranberries

Break banana into chunks and place in a large mixer bowl. (The riper the better; just cut out any black parts.) Mash using the paddle attachment until the banana is pureed and smooth. Mix in pumpkin puree. Add eggs, two at a time, beating well on medium speed after each addition. Add salt.

Pour the coconut flour into the mixer through a sifter or sieve to separate the coconut flour clumps. (You may have to press some remaining coconut flour balls through the wires.) Add the baking powder and xanthan gum, then mix on medium speed, scraping down the sides, until the batter is smooth.

Melt butter in a glass liquid measuring cup. Add honey until you have 1 c. total liquid; stir a little to soften honey. Add to the mixing bowl with the vanilla extract and mix until combined.

Add almond flour, cinnamon and baking soda to mixer and mix until combined, scraping down the sides as needed. Stir in cranberries.

Spread mixture into a greased, 9”x13” baking pan, smoothing the top as much as possible. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes (if using a glass pan – less for a dark, nonstick pan, and possibly longer in a disposable foil pan) or until the top springs back when pressed in the center of the cake. This will get pretty dark because of the pumpkin and almond flour, so don’t worry if it looks overdone!

Serve warm. Store cooled cake tightly covered in the fridge for up to 10 days. Serves 12.

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This easy-to-assemble, deliciously creamy cheesecake is a gluten free version of a recipe I found for the Cheesecake Factory pumpkin cheesecake.  I reduced the recipe to fit an 8″ round disposable aluminum pan (see note), which eliminates the need for a springform pan since you can bend the edge of the pan down to easily release a slice. (It also eliminates the need to wash your pan!) This recipe makes 8 large slices (pictured below) or 10 smaller slices. If you want to double the recipe for more guests, I’d recommend using 2 pans rather than a 10″ springform pan because long, skinny cheesecake slices are impossible to cut and serve neatly.

Pumpkin cheesecake with pecans, whipped cream and caramel!

Pumpkin cheesecake with pecans, whipped cream and caramel!

Crust Substitutions
Because I like a hint of pecans with pumpkin desserts, I substituted pecans ground in a food processor for some of the graham cracker crumbs in the original recipe. (Be careful to grind them just until they resemble crumbs; if you grind too long you’ll end up with nut butter!) I used the gluten free Kinnikinnick Graham Style Crumbs, but you could make the crumbs by crushing or processing in a food processor whole S’morables. (While putting in links just now, I discovered that Pamela’s also makes gluten free graham crackers.) If you need a nut-free dessert, simply substitute additional graham cracker crumbs. Or, if you can’t find gluten free graham crackers in your area, try using gluten free ginger snap crumbs and omit the sugar. Pamela’s, Mi-Del’s, and Trader Joe’s gluten free ginger snaps are all good.

This cheesecake tastes better and better each day, so it’s the perfect dessert to make a day or two before Thanksgiving. I haven’t tried freezing it, but most cheesecakes freeze well. If you freeze it, be sure to cover it with a layer of plastic wrap and foil, then thaw it in the fridge at least 24 hrs. before serving.

For more holiday recipes, type “Thanksgiving” or “Holiday” in the search bar on my blog. And while you’re at it, check out my yummy GF pumpkin pancake or grain free pumpkin cranberry muffin recipes to use up your leftover pumpkin. Happy holidays!

Gluten Free Pumpkin Cheesecake

Crust:
1 c. GF graham cracker crumbs (see crust notes above)
1/3 c. ground pecans
1 T. sugar
¼ c. butter, melted

Filling:
2 pkgs. cream cheese, softened
2/3 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2/3 c. canned pumpkin
2 eggs
¾ tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. ea. allspice, nutmeg, pumpkin pie spice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine dry ingredients for crust in a disposable, 8” round foil pan.  (Note: I bought the kind that comes with a paper/foil lid at the dollar store, and while it says 9″ pan on the label, the bottom of the pan measures 8 inches.) Stir in melted better and toss with a fork until combined. Press into bottom and partway up sides of pan. Bake 5 minutes, then set aside until ready to fill.

Combine cream cheese, sugar and vanilla in mixer. Mix on medium-low until lumps disappear. Add remaining ingredients and mix until smooth. Pour into crust and smooth the top.

Place crust in a 9”x13” pan filled with 1 in. water. Bake 55-65 minutes until just set and the top appears dull. (If it’s cracked it’s overdone.)  Remove from oven and let cool on wire rack (out of water bath) for 10 min. Run a knife around the edge of the pan to release the edges, then continue to let cool until room temperature. Cover carefully and refrigerate overnight. (You don’t want any plastic wrap to touch the top of the cheesecake, but you also don’t want it to taste like the leftover pizza in your fridge.)

Serve with whipped cream and additional pecans or caramel sauce or crushed ginger snaps – or all of it!

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After a lovely summer of letting my children forage for their breakfast most days, I decided to celebrate our first cool, fall day with some I-can’t-believe-these-are-gluten-free ooey, gooey, caramel sticky buns. My family loves cinnamon rolls, but as those are tricky to make gluten free and require a lot of work, these little bites of heaven satisfy their desire for sweet rolls and my desire to not curse while baking.

Now if you are a more recent follower of my blog, you’ve probably come to expect low sugar, grain free or otherwise healthy recipes from me. This recipe is…um…not those things. But sometimes you need a recipe that will knock the socks off of a gluten-free skeptic, and so I feel obligated to share with you the mouth-watering result of my combining and tweaking the Namaste biscuit and Pillsbury Caramel Sticky Bun recipes. Happy fall baking (or whatever excuse you need to make these)!

Sticky Buns

Biscuit Ingredients:
2/3 c. milk + 2 tsp. white vinegar (to make buttermilk)
1 egg
1/2 c. very cold butter
2 c. Namaste Flour Blend (or other GF flour blend + 1 tsp. xanthan gum)
1 T. sugar
1 T. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt (I just eyeballed a scant tsp.)
1/8 tsp. baking soda (omit if using other milk besides buttermilk)

Biscuit Coating:
1/3 c. sugar
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3 T. butter, melted

Caramel Topping:
1/4 c. butter
1/4 c. brown sugar
2 T. maple syrup
1/2 tsp. vanilla (vanilla flavoring, not vanilla extract)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Pop the 1/2 c. butter for the biscuits in the freezer to get it nice and cold. Put the 3 T. butter for the biscuit coating in a microwave safe bowl and set aside. Combine the sugar and cinnamon for the biscuit coating in another bowl and set aside.

In a 1 c. liquid measuring cup, combine 2/3 c. milk with 2 tsp. white vinegar and stir to make buttermilk. (Using buttermilk really does make a difference in the texture of the biscuits, but if you need to use a dairy free milk, skip this step and omit the vinegar and baking soda.) Set aside.

In a large bowl, use a fork to combine the flour (plus xanthan gum if using a GF blend that does not contain any xanthan or guar gum), sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda (only if using buttermilk, which is needed to activate the soda). Take the butter out of the freezer and chop it into 8 slices, cutting each of those into quarters until it’s all in little cubes.

Toss half of the cubes in the flour mixture with the fork to coat. (This makes it easier to cut in butter without it all sticking together.) Using a pastry blender or two knives, start cutting in the butter. Add the remaining cubes and coat with flour, then cut in the butter until it is all in pea-sized or smaller crumbles. (And when you’re all done, recall that you have a food processor in the garage that is meant to make short work of projects such as this, then kick yourself for not remembering sooner.)

Place the 1/4 c. butter for the caramel topping in an ungreased, deep 8″x8″ pan and pop it in the oven to melt while you form the biscuits. (You really do need a pan with deep sides because the caramel will bubble up, and I can tell you from personal experience what a travesty it is to have the precious, yummy caramel bubble over onto the oven liner, making the whole house smell like burnt sugar for days. Heed this warning, gentle reader, lest ye suffer likewise.)

Crack the egg into the buttermilk and mix well with a fork. Stir this into the flour mixture with the fork until just combined. Place a little extra flour in a measuring cup to dip your fingers in to keep the biscuit dough from sticking to them. With floured fingers, pull off  2-3 T.-sized chunks of dough and roll into a ball, then gently flatten into a smallish biscuit on a piece of waxed paper. (The size/number is up to you; the smaller the biscuit, the more surface area is covered with sugar and the more servings you have. I ended up with 15.) Continue until all the dough is rolled into biscuits, occasionally checking on the butter in the oven to see if it’s melted.

Remove pan with melted butter from the oven (before it browns). Stir in the brown sugar until it dissolves. Add maple syrup and vanilla. Stir until you have a buttery caramel, occasionally swatting away fingers of children who wish to sample the caramel.

Melt butter for biscuit coating in the microwave, about 30 seconds. Dip biscuits into the butter, then coat in the sugar/cinnamon mixture you set aside AGES ago. (We’re almost there!!) Place biscuits on top of the caramel mixture in the pan, overlapping as necessary to make them all fit.

Bake 20-25 minutes until golden and biscuits are no longer doughy in the center. Let cool for 2 minutes (while you pour a cup of coffee or heat some sausage to serve with these in an effort to avert a sugar-coma).

Place an upside-down pretty serving plate on top of the pan (so your family will recognize that this is a special occasion and acknowledge your efforts accordingly) and, using oven mitts – duh – carefully invert the pan onto the serving plate. Spoon any remaining caramel from the pan onto the rolls (or save it for yourself as a reward for later if your family fails to give you the proper praise). Serve immediately.

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