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It was the middle of October, and my son’s intestinal issues had gone from bad to worse. Past doctors visits had yielded no helpful information, and my attempt to put him on a gut-healing diet earlier in the year had caused my extremely underweight teenager to start losing weight. So I sought council from a nutritional expert friend of mine on inflammation, in the hope that it would give me some direction on how to help my son. She told me what I already knew from countless hours of research: that toxins and certain foods cause inflammation, and inflammation is the root of almost all our diseases. I had read all about inflammation, but the more I researched, the longer the list of dangerous foods to avoid became, leaving me feeling even more overwhelmed and discouraged.

But then she said something surprising. She said that if we are believers in Christ, the Holy Spirit dwells in every cell of our bodies, and only he knows what is wrong and how to fix it. We need the discernment of the Holy Spirit in all areas of our life, including our health. When we face physical difficulties, we need to seek God’s direction first (before Web MD) because God is our healer, whether he chooses to heal us through medicine, diet, or some other means.

This should not have come as a shock to me, since I have often experienced the leading of the Holy Spirit in other areas of my life, but I had been blinded to the fact that I had been turning to diet and the internet for healing instead of God. As the day wore on, I felt the familiar tug of the Holy Spirit on my heart, and God challenged me to believe that he wanted to heal me of my own intestinal issues. For three years I had struggled with bloating and cramping, and had identified corn, beans, yeast, onions, soy, and wheat as problems for me. Last spring, I attempted an incredibly strict “gut healing” diet to rid me of these issues – the same one that was a disaster for my son – but it only led to a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth that increased the number of foods I had to limit! I had done all the research, followed the wisdom of the “experts,” and only found myself pulled further into bondage to food.

That day, following my conversation with my friend, I realized that I had embraced the knowledge that God can set me free from bondage to fear, but it had never occurred to me that my physical bondage to food sensitivities and fear of food were areas of my life that needed to come under the authority of Christ. God said to me, “I want to heal you and set you free from your captivity to food so that you will know that I alone am God and have the power to heal. Food is not to be feared for I am the Creator of all things, and if I say it’s good, it’s good. Food is neither your healer; I am.”

Later, God confirmed this direction with 1 Timothy 4:3-5, in which the Apostle Paul is instructing Timothy to have nothing to do with teachings that call for abstaining “from certain foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth.”

For everything God created is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving, because it is consecrated by the word of God and prayer.

Essentially, God challenged me to stop believing that it is what I eat – or don’t eat – that gives me health. It is the manner in which I eat that matters. Am I choosing or excluding foods based on fear because of something I read, or am I accepting everything God has provided for me with an attitude of thanksgiving, believing that if I have prayed and asked God to bless it, he will make it safe for me? Who is my God, the Creator or his creation? I had embraced the philosophy that “food has power” because it seemed right in my eyes, but I then became a slave to fear and a whole host of rules because when we ascribe power to anything other than God, we end up bowing down to it and becoming its slave. I’m not saying we should all throw out sound nutritional advice or ignore food allergies, but rather that we need the Holy Spirit’s discernment in order to know which of the many competing – and often contradictory – voices we hear in medicine and on the internet are right for us! I can’t tell you what’s right for you, but God can.

So I told God that I believe that he is my healer, and that night I ate pulled pork on a wheat bun, salad with soy sauce and onions, and delicious chocolate cake! In the months that followed, each time I ate something that used to hurt me or that was on the “bad foods” list, I gave thanks to God for his healing, and asked him to bless it to my body. At first, I continued to experience some bloating, but each time I did, I said – often aloud – “Thank you Lord for healing me and blessing this food to my body.” And the symptoms would disappear. Last month my family went out for Mexican food for the first time in 3 years because, praise God, I am fully healed!

However, knowing that God is my healer, I still struggled over what to do for my son. By the last week before Christmas break he was discouraged by his physical discomfort and desperate for help. Having not heard a word from the Lord after months of prayer, I reluctantly turned back to the gut-healing diet, hoping that would help. But who wants to give up treats at Christmastime? Clearly, if I followed the wisdom I “knew,” which was to stop feeding him processed food so his intestines would heal, it would further discourage his spirit at a time when we should be celebrating. After 1 week of misery on the diet that resulted in symptoms that only grew worse, God finally spoke.

Celebrate. That was God’s direction for me, and his word over my son’s healing. God revealed that he was going to heal my son not through abstinence from certain foods, but through feasting on them! My instructions from the Lord were to do and cook whatever would bless my family and create an atmosphere of celebration. For my family, that means certain recipes that are a part of our holiday traditions. My son would not accept bacon-wrapped dates; it had to be bacon-wrapped Little Smokies! Just as God commanded the Isrealites to observe days of feasting, rest, and celebration of God’s goodness, God said to me, “Celebrate, rest, and watch for my deliverance.”

Sometimes God heals us through obedience to natural laws and following logical medical advice. I absolutely believe that. But sometimes God chooses to heal us in spite of those laws because he wants to open our eyes to the mighty power of God and will not share his glory with anything else. He wants there to be no question in our minds that our deliverance came from him! Friends, I never felt like I was supposed to pray for healing for myself because I just assumed it was God’s will for me to suffer. God allowed me to go through a season of suffering, about which I wrote in this post from last spring, because I kept turning to food and the wisdom of others to save me. In this season of my life, God is teaching me that I must trust him with every aspect of my life and the lives of my children, and seek HIS wisdom first, no matter how crazy it sounds.

So that morning, through tears of surrender, I made cinnamon rolls. I stopped worrying about whether or not what we ate was healthy – although we eat very healthy anyway – and focused on giving thanks to God. We began the habit of reading passages of scripture after dinner, then sharing something for which we’re thankful – a habit we’ve kept up since the holidays and hope will become a permanent routine. After we’ve shared, we each enjoy a piece of really good chocolate. Because God is good. He is worthy to be praised and makes all things for our enjoyment.

In the 4 weeks since our “celebration regiment” began, we’ve noticed a huge change in my son’s intestinal issues. His terrible symptoms are gone, he is healing, and we give God ALL THE GLORY! When we face our most difficult challenges and say, “No matter what, God is good and I will delight in his provision for me,” we don’t just get victory over the enemy and fear. We triumph and get the spoils!

You might think that this is a “how to” post on healing, or assume I’m implying that God wants to heal everyone supernaturally (which I’m NOT), and perhaps the reason why I have not felt God’s permission to blog throughout all this is that I might have been tempted to end this post right here. However, I hope that as you’ve been reading, the question that’s come to your mind is, “How could she know that God wanted to heal them that way?” Because while healing is part of my story and now my son’s, God’s purpose in healing was to teach me this message I share with you today: We need discernment from the Holy Spirit in ALL areas of our life – physical, spiritual, emotional, relational, mental, habitual – and it will only come through a relationship with Jesus Christ. He is our healer and deliverer, and only he knows from what we need to be set free. If we look to any wisdom of this world to save us, it will only take us captive. No book or blog – including this one – will show you and me the path to a victorious life. We must be led along it daily by the gentle hand of Jesus. Freedom from fear is the victory; healing is just one of the spoils. 

So how do we develop spiritual discernment? How do we know if and when God wants to heal us or set us free from some sort of bondage? First, we do not seek a healing; we seek the Healer. A relationship with Jesus Christ is the beginning and end of our spiritual journey. If you have not asked Jesus into your heart by believing that he is the Son of God who died for your sins, was raised from the dead in order to conquer sin and death for all who would believe in him, and sits at the right hand of God interceding on behalf of those who love him, then that is the first step. When you have invited Jesus to be Lord of your life, then he gives you the gift of the Holy Spirit, who enables you to have the mind of Christ in your circumstances. (If you would like to do this today, please leave a comment so I can pray with you, although you don’t need me to pray in order to receive Christ into your heart. You need only to confess your sins to him and ask him to be Lord of your life.)

How do you know if you have the mind of Christ as you’re considering the choices before you? To properly discern the Holy Spirit’s voice from your own or other influences, you must:

  • Learn to distinguish God’s voice by reading the Bible, God’s revelation of his love for humanity and desire for relationship with us. God will not direct you in ways that are contrary to his Word. That’s why each time I’ve prayed for direction, I’ve specifically asked God to back it up in the Bible before I act on it. The beautiful thing about reading the Bible daily is that God almost always has the confirmation of his word to me right there in that day’s selection. I didn’t seek it out; he had it waiting for me on his appointed day. Don’t let the enemy discourage you if you struggle with doing this on a daily basis at first. We don’t read the Bible to impress God with our devotion; we read it to connect with him. When you miss a day, don’t stress about it. Ask God to give you a desire for his Word, and pick it up the next day!
  • Listen to Bible-teaching, Spirit-filled preachers and teachers, and belong to a community of believers. Pray for God to reveal himself to you through his Word and godly teachers. I receive direction from the Holy Spirit as God’s Spirit within me rises up with a resounding “YES!” every time I read the scriptures or hear a message from someone through whom God wants to speak to me. When all messages line up – even if it doesn’t make logical sense – obey.
  • Obedience is key to spiritual discernment. If you don’t obey when you know what God wants you to do, you will eventually cease to hear the voice of the Holy Spirit until some disaster strikes and you come seeking him. If you draw near to God, he promises to draw near to you (James 4:8). Obedience often begins with simply praying in agreement with whatever you’re reading in God’s Word. Pray, “Yes, Lord. Thank you for this truth I’m reading. Show me how to live it in my daily life.”
  • Finally, discernment is something for which we should earnestly pray and seek. Our lives on earth matter. There are eternal consequences to our actions. God healed my son and has been prospering him in public high school (after being homeschooled for the past 6 1/2 years) in order to pry my white-knuckled hands off of him, and show both of us that Jesus is his Savior – not me. He set me free from intestinal issues so that I would stop preaching that the gluten-free or grain-free diet saves, and instead speak the truth that Jesus saves. He alone is the Way, the Truth, and the Life!

Christ Jesus came to set us free from bondage. Sometimes that bondage is physical, and sometimes it’s spiritual. He loved us, while we were still sinners, and died to set us free. If the Son has set you free, then you are free indeed! Praise God and give him glory!

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This delicious, holiday breakfast cake is full of fiber, protein and pumpkiny goodness that won’t spike your blood sugar or cause you to gain weight. (We’ll leave that job to Grandma’s sugar cookies and fudge.) Nicely spiced with cinnamon and vanilla, there’s just enough sweetness (from only 1/2 c. honey!) to compliment the tartness of the cranberries. If you don’t care for fresh (or frozen) cranberries, you can substitute dried cranberries, although they are heavily sweetened with sugar.

Using a half coconut flour, half almond flour blend delivers a wonderful texture and moist crumb that lasts for over a week in the fridge, which makes this a great make-ahead recipe for your gluten free or dieting guests.  (Check with strict Paleo guests to make sure they’re okay with the xanthan gum and baking powder; everything else is Paleo. You can omit these ingredients, but it will affect the texture and rise.) If you’re not a fan of coconut, rest assured that there are so many other flavors going on in this recipe that you’ll get all the health benefits of coconut flour without tasting it!

Although this resembles a muffin more than a cake in terms of sweetness, baking it like a cake in a 9″x13″ pan makes the equivalent of 2-dozen muffins without all the scooping (and yes, I’m just that lazy). This is one of my daily breakfast choices that helps me maintain my weight loss, but if you’re looking for a holiday treat to please your sweet tooth, check out my gluten free caramel sticky buns and bacon-wrapped smokies. However, with the guilt-free breakfast below, you can have your (breakfast) cake and eat it too!

Pumpkin Cranberry Cake

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cranberry Breakfast Cake

1 very ripe medium banana
½ c. pumpkin puree
6 eggs
½ tsp. salt
¾ c. coconut flour
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. xanthan gum, slightly rounded
½ c. butter, melted
½ c. honey
2 tsp. vanilla extract
¾ c. almond flour (fine flour, not coarse almond meal)
1½ tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. baking soda
1½ c. fresh or frozen cranberries

Break banana into chunks and place in a large mixer bowl. (The riper the better; just cut out any black parts.) Mash using the paddle attachment until the banana is pureed and smooth. Mix in pumpkin puree. Add eggs, two at a time, beating well on medium speed after each addition. Add salt.

Pour the coconut flour into the mixer through a sifter or sieve to separate the coconut flour clumps. (You may have to press some remaining coconut flour balls through the wires.) Add the baking powder and xanthan gum, then mix on medium speed, scraping down the sides, until the batter is smooth.

Melt butter in a glass liquid measuring cup. Add honey until you have 1 c. total liquid; stir a little to soften honey. Add to the mixing bowl with the vanilla extract and mix until combined.

Add almond flour, cinnamon and baking soda to mixer and mix until combined, scraping down the sides as needed. Stir in cranberries.

Spread mixture into a greased, 9”x13” baking pan, smoothing the top as much as possible. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes (if using a glass pan – less for a dark, nonstick pan, and possibly longer in a disposable foil pan) or until the top springs back when pressed in the center of the cake. This will get pretty dark because of the pumpkin and almond flour, so don’t worry if it looks overdone!

Serve warm. Store cooled cake tightly covered in the fridge for up to 10 days. Serves 12.

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This easy-to-assemble, deliciously creamy cheesecake is a gluten free version of a recipe I found for the Cheesecake Factory pumpkin cheesecake.  I reduced the recipe to fit an 8″ round disposable aluminum pan (see note), which eliminates the need for a springform pan since you can bend the edge of the pan down to easily release a slice. (It also eliminates the need to wash your pan!) This recipe makes 8 large slices (pictured below) or 10 smaller slices. If you want to double the recipe for more guests, I’d recommend using 2 pans rather than a 10″ springform pan because long, skinny cheesecake slices are impossible to cut and serve neatly.

Pumpkin cheesecake with pecans, whipped cream and caramel!

Pumpkin cheesecake with pecans, whipped cream and caramel!

Crust Substitutions
Because I like a hint of pecans with pumpkin desserts, I substituted pecans ground in a food processor for some of the graham cracker crumbs in the original recipe. (Be careful to grind them just until they resemble crumbs; if you grind too long you’ll end up with nut butter!) I used the gluten free Kinnikinnick Graham Style Crumbs, but you could make the crumbs by crushing or processing in a food processor whole S’morables. (While putting in links just now, I discovered that Pamela’s also makes gluten free graham crackers.) If you need a nut-free dessert, simply substitute additional graham cracker crumbs. Or, if you can’t find gluten free graham crackers in your area, try using gluten free ginger snap crumbs and omit the sugar. Pamela’s, Mi-Del’s, and Trader Joe’s gluten free ginger snaps are all good.

This cheesecake tastes better and better each day, so it’s the perfect dessert to make a day or two before Thanksgiving. I haven’t tried freezing it, but most cheesecakes freeze well. If you freeze it, be sure to cover it with a layer of plastic wrap and foil, then thaw it in the fridge at least 24 hrs. before serving.

For more holiday recipes, type “Thanksgiving” or “Holiday” in the search bar on my blog. And while you’re at it, check out my yummy GF pumpkin pancake or grain free pumpkin cranberry muffin recipes to use up your leftover pumpkin. Happy holidays!

Gluten Free Pumpkin Cheesecake

Crust:
1 c. GF graham cracker crumbs (see crust notes above)
1/3 c. ground pecans
1 T. sugar
¼ c. butter, melted

Filling:
2 pkgs. cream cheese, softened
2/3 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2/3 c. canned pumpkin
2 eggs
¾ tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. ea. allspice, nutmeg, pumpkin pie spice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine dry ingredients for crust in a disposable, 8” round foil pan.  (Note: I bought the kind that comes with a paper/foil lid at the dollar store, and while it says 9″ pan on the label, the bottom of the pan measures 8 inches.) Stir in melted better and toss with a fork until combined. Press into bottom and partway up sides of pan. Bake 5 minutes, then set aside until ready to fill.

Combine cream cheese, sugar and vanilla in mixer. Mix on medium-low until lumps disappear. Add remaining ingredients and mix until smooth. Pour into crust and smooth the top.

Place crust in a 9”x13” pan filled with 1 in. water. Bake 55-65 minutes until just set and the top appears dull. (If it’s cracked it’s overdone.)  Remove from oven and let cool on wire rack (out of water bath) for 10 min. Run a knife around the edge of the pan to release the edges, then continue to let cool until room temperature. Cover carefully and refrigerate overnight. (You don’t want any plastic wrap to touch the top of the cheesecake, but you also don’t want it to taste like the leftover pizza in your fridge.)

Serve with whipped cream and additional pecans or caramel sauce or crushed ginger snaps – or all of it!

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After a lovely summer of letting my children forage for their breakfast most days, I decided to celebrate our first cool, fall day with some I-can’t-believe-these-are-gluten-free ooey, gooey, caramel sticky buns. My family loves cinnamon rolls, but as those are tricky to make gluten free and require a lot of work, these little bites of heaven satisfy their desire for sweet rolls and my desire to not curse while baking.

Now if you are a more recent follower of my blog, you’ve probably come to expect low sugar, grain free or otherwise healthy recipes from me. This recipe is…um…not those things. But sometimes you need a recipe that will knock the socks off of a gluten-free skeptic, and so I feel obligated to share with you the mouth-watering result of my combining and tweaking the Namaste biscuit and Pillsbury Caramel Sticky Bun recipes. Happy fall baking (or whatever excuse you need to make these)!

Sticky Buns

Biscuit Ingredients:
2/3 c. milk + 2 tsp. white vinegar (to make buttermilk)
1 egg
1/2 c. very cold butter
2 c. Namaste Flour Blend (or other GF flour blend + 1 tsp. xanthan gum)
1 T. sugar
1 T. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt (I just eyeballed a scant tsp.)
1/8 tsp. baking soda (omit if using other milk besides buttermilk)

Biscuit Coating:
1/3 c. sugar
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3 T. butter, melted

Caramel Topping:
1/4 c. butter
1/4 c. brown sugar
2 T. maple syrup
1/2 tsp. vanilla (vanilla flavoring, not vanilla extract)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Pop the 1/2 c. butter for the biscuits in the freezer to get it nice and cold. Put the 3 T. butter for the biscuit coating in a microwave safe bowl and set aside. Combine the sugar and cinnamon for the biscuit coating in another bowl and set aside.

In a 1 c. liquid measuring cup, combine 2/3 c. milk with 2 tsp. white vinegar and stir to make buttermilk. (Using buttermilk really does make a difference in the texture of the biscuits, but if you need to use a dairy free milk, skip this step and omit the vinegar and baking soda.) Set aside.

In a large bowl, use a fork to combine the flour (plus xanthan gum if using a GF blend that does not contain any xanthan or guar gum), sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda (only if using buttermilk, which is needed to activate the soda). Take the butter out of the freezer and chop it into 8 slices, cutting each of those into quarters until it’s all in little cubes.

Toss half of the cubes in the flour mixture with the fork to coat. (This makes it easier to cut in butter without it all sticking together.) Using a pastry blender or two knives, start cutting in the butter. Add the remaining cubes and coat with flour, then cut in the butter until it is all in pea-sized or smaller crumbles. (And when you’re all done, recall that you have a food processor in the garage that is meant to make short work of projects such as this, then kick yourself for not remembering sooner.)

Place the 1/4 c. butter for the caramel topping in an ungreased, deep 8″x8″ pan and pop it in the oven to melt while you form the biscuits. (You really do need a pan with deep sides because the caramel will bubble up, and I can tell you from personal experience what a travesty it is to have the precious, yummy caramel bubble over onto the oven liner, making the whole house smell like burnt sugar for days. Heed this warning, gentle reader, lest ye suffer likewise.)

Crack the egg into the buttermilk and mix well with a fork. Stir this into the flour mixture with the fork until just combined. Place a little extra flour in a measuring cup to dip your fingers in to keep the biscuit dough from sticking to them. With floured fingers, pull off  2-3 T.-sized chunks of dough and roll into a ball, then gently flatten into a smallish biscuit on a piece of waxed paper. (The size/number is up to you; the smaller the biscuit, the more surface area is covered with sugar and the more servings you have. I ended up with 15.) Continue until all the dough is rolled into biscuits, occasionally checking on the butter in the oven to see if it’s melted.

Remove pan with melted butter from the oven (before it browns). Stir in the brown sugar until it dissolves. Add maple syrup and vanilla. Stir until you have a buttery caramel, occasionally swatting away fingers of children who wish to sample the caramel.

Melt butter for biscuit coating in the microwave, about 30 seconds. Dip biscuits into the butter, then coat in the sugar/cinnamon mixture you set aside AGES ago. (We’re almost there!!) Place biscuits on top of the caramel mixture in the pan, overlapping as necessary to make them all fit.

Bake 20-25 minutes until golden and biscuits are no longer doughy in the center. Let cool for 2 minutes (while you pour a cup of coffee or heat some sausage to serve with these in an effort to avert a sugar-coma).

Place an upside-down pretty serving plate on top of the pan (so your family will recognize that this is a special occasion and acknowledge your efforts accordingly) and, using oven mitts – duh – carefully invert the pan onto the serving plate. Spoon any remaining caramel from the pan onto the rolls (or save it for yourself as a reward for later if your family fails to give you the proper praise). Serve immediately.

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After a year of tweaking my Paleo pancake recipe, I finally found the secret to delicious, grain-free, refined sugar-free pancakes that don’t turn into scrambled pancake – *#$*@%* – on my griddle. (There is no curse in Elvish, Entish, or the tongues of men for the treachery of banana/egg/coconut flour pancakes that stick to the griddle in a gloppy mess.) “So Brenda, what did you learn from your year of trial and error?” asked no one. Well, I’m going to tell you in great detail anyway, because it has been a loooooong process of discovery that must be documented.

Moist and Pliable…
The secret to pliable, easy to flip pancakes was right there in my gluten-free baking supplies: xanthan gum, which replaces the gluten in GF baking and keeps breads from being crumbly. To the Paleo purists it is off limits, but to those of us who prefer to eat our pancakes with a fork and not a spoon, xanthan gum is our friend (and is a totally benign ingredient, so I’m okay with it).

It also helps greatly if you cook grain-free pancakes in a generous amount of bacon grease or coconut oil. I usually start with the grease left on the griddle after cooking some bacon – oh yeah – and add coconut oil as needed to keep it greased. The other key ingredient is almond milk (unsweetened for a totally refined sugar-free pancake, or original if that’s what you have on hand), which helps to smooth out the batter and make it less eggy.

While making gluten free pancakes from scratch with grains for my family, I discovered that “regular” pancakes use both baking soda and baking powder. The baking soda makes them brown nicely, while the baking powder adds extra leavening. While most Paleo recipes shun baking powder – it contains cornstarch! gasp! – I find that adding it really makes a difference in making grain-free pancakes less dense and heavy. It also helps to lighten them up if you beat the eggs well in the mixer while making your batter.

Yet Healthy and Filling
I’ve made pancakes with just coconut flour, but I prefer to combine it with almond flour for better texture and less coconutty flavor. Coconut flour is full of fiber and good-for-you stuff, but almond flour is high in protein and lower in carbs, so the two combined provide a filling breakfast that will keep you energized until lunch (and keep cravings for carbs/sweets at bay, which is why this breakfast is a key component of my weight loss success).  You can make these with melted coconut oil instead of butter for a totally dairy-free option, but I prefer the taste/texture of pancakes made with melted butter (probably because the coconut oil starts to harden in the batter).

Full of Flavor with No Refined Sugar
I eat these tasty pancakes with a hint of sweetness every day, and add variety by topping them with whatever berries are in season (sometimes with a little canned whipped cream for a decadent treat). However, there’s so much flavor from the pure maple syrup, vanilla, cinnamon and bananas that I usually just spread a little butter on them and that’s it.

Grain Free Pancakes

Grain-free, Refined Sugar-free Pancakes

1 very ripe banana (brown peel)
1/4 c. unsweetened applesauce
6 eggs
1/4 c. unsalted butter, melted (for salted butter, cut salt to 1/4 tsp.)
1/4 c. pure maple syrup (I’ve used honey, but prefer the hint of maple)
2/3 c. coconut flour
1/3 c. almond flour (not almond meal)
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. salt (1/4 tsp. if using salted butter)
1/2 tsp. xanthan gum
1/2 – 3/4 c. almond milk (unsweetened for refined sugar-free pancakes)
Bacon grease and/or coconut oil for cooking

Break the banana into chunks and mash in the bowl of your mixer, using the paddle attachment. (If it’s not overripe, you may want to put your hands over the top of the bowl when you start the mixer, to avoid flying bananas that rain down like manna from heaven on your dog who is constantly underfoot in the kitchen precisely because of moments such as this.) When the banana is a thick puree, add applesauce. Mix in eggs, 2 at a time, beating until foamy after each addition.

Melt butter in a liquid measuring cup, then add maple syrup to the butter. (I just add syrup to the melted butter until it reaches the 1/2 c. mark, and stir it a little to make it easy to pour.) Add butter/syrup mixture to the mixing bowl and mix well.

At this point, I usually start cooking the bacon on the griddle. Mmmm…bacon.

Measure coconut flour and pour through a sifter into the batter. (If you don’t have a sifter, don’t worry, but it does help to incorporate the coconut flour without chunks.) Add remaining ingredients except almond milk and mix well. Slowly mix in almond milk. The batter will be thick.

Preheat griddle to 325 degrees (which is cooler than you’d use for regular pancakes, but because of the high egg content you need to allow more time to cook without over-browning). Spoon about 1/4 c. batter onto well-greased griddle, adding more coconut oil as needed, and gently spread out batter with the back of a spoon. (It will not spread on its own, like regular pancakes, so gently spread it out into a 4″-4.5″ circle.) When the outside edges appear dry, they’re ready to be flipped. They take a little longer to cook on the first side than regular pancakes, but quickly brown on the second side and are ready to be removed.

These stay soft and pliable in the fridge for a week and freeze well.  This recipe makes about 18 pancakes.

Reheating Tip: Since these are delicate on the surface, butter before you reheat them in the microwave to avoid tearing. In the fall, I like to skip the butter and top them with cranberry apple spread from Trader Joe’s, which only has 4 g. sugar per tablespoon. So good!

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These buttery, brownie/chocolate chip blondie hybrid bars are absolutely addictive! Unlike most desserts, these grain-free goodies taste better and better each day after you make them, and will last for 3 weeks in an airtight container – if you can make it that long without gobbling them up.  (Mine last that long because I won’t share them with my kids. I gave them life; they can eat store-bought GF cookies.)

The bar pictured is 3 weeks old and still has a moist, buttery crumb and melt-in-your-mouth chocolate chips when heated in the microwave.

The bar pictured is 3 weeks old and still has a moist,       buttery crumb and melt-in-your-mouth chocolate chips when heated in the microwave.

Warning: Please consume responsibly. Since these are made with honey instead of sugar, and almond flour instead of high-carb flours, you might be tempted to pretend that these are “healthy.” Feel free to make them a regular part of your Weight Loss for 1 in a Family of 4  diet in small amounts for dessert – but not dinner.

Grain-Free Nutella Bars

10 T. butter, softened (1 cube + 2 T.)
½ c. Nutella (chocolate hazelnut spread)
½ c. honey
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 ¼ c. almond flour (not almond meal)
¾ tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 c. semi-sweet chocolate chips
¼ c. mini semi-sweet chocolate chips

In a large mixing bowl, mix the butter, Nutella, and honey until smooth.  Mix in eggs and vanilla.  Add almond flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda.  Mix well.  Stir in chocolate chips.

Spread batter in a greased 9”x13” pan.  Bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees until done in the center.  (These will get dark around the edges because of the cocoa, but they’re not overdone.) Cool completely and store in an airtight container at room temperature. Reheat individual bars for 10-15 seconds before serving.

Dairy Free Chocolate Chip Blondie variation (based on this recipe): Substitute coconut oil for the butter, increase the honey to 2/3 c. and salt to 1 tsp., substitute ½ c. almond butter for the Nutella, and use Ghirardelli or Guittard semi-sweet chocolate chips (which are dairy free).

Keepin’ it Real…
While food bloggers tend to only share their success stories, we also have our share of epic fails. My most disgusting food fail – a 10 on the Gagometer scale – was my attempt to make gravy using potato starch instead of cornstarch.  Apparently, potato starch + turkey drippings = snot. My poor husband – who has bodily fluid issues – was traumatized, and at one point shrieked in horror, “It’s a dangler!”  My son, however, was fascinated by the gelatinous goo stretching from his fork to his plate and reveled in it’s grossness, as is befitting a 13-year-old boy.

"Its a dangler!"

“Its a dangler!”

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Turn on the oven, friends, because in 30 minutes you could be devouring delicious, gluten free, garlic and rosemary bread sticks. Substituting almond flour for 2/3 of the flour makes them low(er) carb. Using some potato starch and tapioca starch makes them crusty on the outside, yet soft and chewy on the inside. (Since potato starch and tapioca starch are derived from root vegetables – tapioca comes from the cassava root – it’s technically grain free, if you’re looking for a Paleoish bread that actually tastes like bread.)  Adding Parmesan cheese to the dough makes the flavor amazing!  And did I mention that the smell is so divine that I want to go lick the leftovers so I don’t have to share them with my family? Excuse me…

GF Rosemary Bread Sticks

I’ve also used this recipe to make pizza crust that is crispy on the bottom, yet pliable, so it supports toppings without being floppy or crumbing to pieces. If you value self care, you will choose the optional step of brushing garlic butter on the edges of the crust at the end. My kids have decided that this is now their favorite pizza crust, and it’s probably because of the garlic butter.

Low-carb Pizza Crust

The only downside of the pizza crust is that it’s best enjoyed fresh from the oven – which means I just gave you an excuse to eat the whole thing. You’re welcome. When I tried to reheat some leftover pizza that had been refrigerated, the crust had absorbed the sauce and turned soggy. Perhaps leftovers could be frozen and reheated in the oven instead of the microwave for better success. Or you could go with the preferred method of eating the whole thing. Your call.  The bread sticks reheat well on subsequent days. The bottom crust becomes soft instead of crusty, but still tastes awesome – especially when dipped in olive oil.

(Pssst, if you’re interested in a weight loss plan that includes this pizza once a week, check out my “Weight Loss for 1 in a Family of 4” easy weekly menu plans. Yes, I lost about 20 lbs. while still enjoying pizza!)

Mmmm... low-carb pizza with garlic butter crust!

Mmmm… low-carb pizza with garlic butter crust!

Low Carb, GF Bread Sticks/Pizza Crust

Dry Ingredients:
1 c. almond flour
1/4 c. tapioca flour/starch (they’re the same)
1/4 c. potato starch (NOT potato flour)
2 T. Parmesan cheese (I used the kind from a can)
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. baking powder
(For bread sticks, also add 1/8 tsp. garlic powder)

Wet Ingredients:
1/4 c. + 1 T. hot water (hot enough to dissolve the honey)
2 T. olive oil + more for topping dough
1 tsp. honey
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
1 egg

Bread Stick Toppings:
Olive oil
1 tsp. dried rosemary, crushed between fingers
Fresh ground pepper
Parmesan cheese
1 T. melted butter

Pizza Crust Directions:
Cut a piece of parchment paper to fit the size of your baking stone/pan.  This makes a 13″ – 14″ pizza, so make the circle at least 15″.  Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  If using a baking stone (recommended), place it in the oven while it preheats. (If you don’t preheat your pan, the crust may not crisp as well.)

Mix together the dry ingredients.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the wet ingredients.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together.  You should have a wet, sticky dough. Don’t worry if it seems more like batter than dough.

Place dough on the parchment paper and, using a greased spoon or silicone spatula, spread it out using circular motions, greasing the spoon as needed.  (I just spray my spatula with nonstick cooking spray when it starts to stick to the dough.) Spread it as thin as you can, with a raised ridge at the edge.  If desired, brush with a little additional olive oil.  (I skipped this step, but plan to do it next time.)

Slide a rimless cookie sheet under the parchment paper to help transfer the crust to the hot baking stone/pan.  Bake 8 minutes, then add toppings.  (I used Prego pizza sauce, Hormel Nitrate-Free Pepperoni, Falls Brand All Natural Hot Italian Sausage, mozzarella, white cheddar, and shredded Parmesan.) Bake 8 minutes more until cheese is bubbly and starts to brown.

For The Most Awesome Crust EVER: Melt 1 T. butter with a dash or two of garlic powder and brush on the edge of the finished pizza.  Pizza AND garlic bread sticks! Sooooooo good.

Bread Stick Recipe:
Follow the above recipe, adding garlic powder to the dry ingredients. After spreading the dough/batter into a 10-in. circle, use a spoon or spatula to press a few indentations into the dough. Drizzle with olive oil, letting it pool in the indentations. Crush rosemary between your fingers and sprinkle over the dough. I used a coarse-grind pepper grinder to lightly top the dough with pepper, then sprinkled a light coating of Parmesan cheese on top.

Bake 10 minutes at 425 degrees. Melt 1 T. butter and drizzle over the top. Use a pizza cutter to cut into strips or wedges and serve immediately. Store any leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week, and serve warm with olive oil for dipping.

Keepin’ It Real…
Not all of my experiments turn out so well.  Here’s my first attempt at making grain free chocolate chip cookies.  The taste is spot on, so I will definitely be trying again, but they’re a bit…thin.

Grain Free Cookie Attempt

Grain free chocolate chip cookie…pieces.

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