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Archive for February, 2013

This fun take on 2 kid favorites – chicken pot pie and pizza – is a recipe I adapted from Family Fun Magazine, and can be made either as a pizza or biscuit pot pie.  I began making the pizza when we figured out that my son was suffering from Intersticial Cystitus, a chronic condition that feels like a constant urinary tract infection.  While there’s no cure, the symptoms can be alleviated by avoiding certain trigger foods like caffeine, citrus and many other fruits, including tomatoes (hence, the search for a tomato-free pizza).

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Before I go on to tell you about this tasty recipe, I just want to take a minute to tell my readers how much my heart goes out to you, especially if you’re a parent of a child with multiple food intolerances.  When I downloaded the enormous list of possible food triggers (many of which we’ve now determined are okay for him), it was like receiving the gluten intolerance diagnosis all over again.  I looked through my pantry with despair at all the foods that would be off limits to my son until we slowly tested each food.  As I looked through my cookbook and tagged the half-dozen recipes there were NOT off limits to him, I cried for him and myself.  I remembered how overwhelmed I was during our first few months on the gluten free diet, and how sad I was that my kids had to be “different.”  If that’s where you are today, I just want you to know that you’re not alone.  

It’s been 6 weeks since then, and my son has handled his new diet restrictions remarkably well.  I’m reminded, once again, of how resilient our kids are.  We think they’ll fall apart when something bad happens, but if we continue to love and support them, showing empathy and compassion, they can amaze us with their ability to bounce back.  Kids with food intolerances have the potential to be some of the most compassionate kids on the planet because they know what it’s like to be the only one who has to pass up the Valentines cookie or sip punch at a reception because it’s the only safe thing to eat.  They also tend to be more grateful when people do go out of their way to include them because they don’t take for granted that they will be given anything.  So yes, it hurts to see our kids suffer, but sometimes the road of suffering is the road that leads to strength of character, compassion, and gratitude.  

One way we can support our kids is by taking the time to make yummy substitutes for some of their favorite foods.  That’s why I’m continuing my series of “Gluten Free Kid Favorites” (like corn dogs and chicken tenders) with the recipe below.   

Whether you like chicken pot pie or are just looking for an easy GF pizza crust recipe, I’ve got you covered on both!  The crust recipe is so versatile.  It makes tender, flaky biscuits, a quick and easy pizza crust, and can be used in your favorite recipes that call for Pillsbury biscuits from a can.  I like to mix up the dry ingredients in bags to have on hand for quick suppers.  If you have a food processor, you can simply dump the dry ingredients in, cut in the butter, then add milk.  So easy!  I’ve made it with half milk and half cream for extra moist biscuits, and rice milk for dairy free recipes.  The pot pie filling is spot on when it comes to mimicking those little (nutritionally void and laden with unhealthy ingredients) frozen pies I used to love.

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Chicken or Turkey Pot Pie Filling/Topping

1 T. butter
1 T. GF flour blend with a pinch of xanthan gum
1 tsp. chicken flavored Better Than Bouillon + 2/3 c. water (or 2/3 c. GF chicken broth)
1/2 tsp. dried minced onion
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. sage (I use ground sage, not rubbed)
1/4 tsp. thyme
2/3 – 1 c. frozen mixed veggies, thawed and patted dry (I use peas, diced carrots, and corn)
2/3 – 1 c. cooked chicken or turkey, chopped
1 c. shredded mozzarella (optional, if making biscuit pot pie cups)

Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat.  Whisk in flour and cook for 1 minute.  If using Better Than Bouillon, whisk this into the roux (the flour/butter mixture).  Slowly whisk in the water (or chicken broth) until the mixture is smooth.  Cook, stirring constantly, until it thickens and begins to bubble, about 2 min.  Whisk in onion and seasonings, and cook for 1 more minute.

Remove from heat and let cool while you make the dough.  If you made the dough first, just pop the sauce in the fridge on a hot pad to quickly cool while you chop the meat.

Biscuit and Pizza Crust Dough

1 c. gluten free flour blend
1/4 c. tapioca starch/flour (they’re the same thing)
1/4 c. potato starch (for softer biscuits) or cornstarch (for pizza crust)
2 1/2 T. baking powder
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. xanthan gum
1/4 c. butter or dairy free margarine (real butter is best, if tolerated)
2/3 c. milk, rice milk, or half-and-half (for really good biscuits)

Whisk dry ingredients together in a mixing bowl or food processor.  Cut butter into chunks, then cut into dry ingredients with a food processor or two knives used like scissors.  (When I use my food processor, I like to add half the butter and pulse a few times, then add the remaining butter chunks and pulse a few more times.  Ideally, you want some pieces to be small and some larger pea-size chunks.  Smartypants Factoid: It’s the steam created from the melting of the larger chunks of butter that creates the flaky layers in biscuits, so don’t over-process.)  Stir in milk.

For Pizza: With floured hands, spread dough onto a 15-in. greased pizza pan or, if preheating a pizza stone in the oven, spread dough onto a piece of parchment paper cut to fit the stone.  (Preheating your pan will help brown the bottom of the crust.)  Spread sauce over the crust and top with 1 c. veggies and 1 c. meat.  Sprinkle cheese evenly over the pizza.  Bake 18-20 min. at 425 degrees.  (This crust also works with any topping, not just the pot pie topping!)

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For Pot Pies: Divide dough into quarters.  Divide each quarter into 3 balls.  Place the balls in 12 greased muffin cups.  With floured hands, gently press the dough down and up the sides of each muffin cup.  The dough should reach the top of the muffin cup.  (If you do this before making the filling, you may need to go back and press the dough up the sides again before filling, since it will slide down after sitting for awhile.)  Stir 2/3 c. meat and 2/3 c. veggies into the sauce and divide among the cups, about 2 T. filling per cup.  If desired, sprinkle with cheese.  Bake 15-20 minutes at 425 degrees.

For Biscuits: Divide dough into quarters or thirds (depending on how big you want your biscuits to be) and roll into balls according to pot pie directions.  Place the balls on a parchment-lined baking sheet and, with floured hands or the bottom of a glass, gently press down on each ball until it’s about 1/2-in. thick.  Or, using an ice cream scoop, scoop out the dough onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and gently press down to flatten.  (These won’t rise or spread much, so you’ll end up with more even results if the biscuits are flat instead of rounded.)  Bake 15-20 minutes at 425 degrees.

There are lots more variations for this dough, so check back for future recipes like Garlic Cheese Biscuits, Bread Sticks, and more!

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